Posts tagged ‘good life permaculture’

Beekeeping for Beginners: Okines #4

HANDS-ON LEARNING, EQUIPPING YOU WITH THE SKILLS TO KEEP BEES AT YOUR PLACE.

We’re partnering with Okines Community Garden in Dodges Ferry to bring you a special 6-part series of hands-on permaculture skills. This is workshop #4, Introduction to Smallscale Beekeeping. A one-day introduction to small-scale beekeeping course designed for the beginner and novice beekeeper keen to have one (or a few) hives in their homes. We’ll guide you through the key foundations of bee theory and action so that by the end of the day you’ll be either ready to start on your bee journey, add to it or refine it.

If you live in the South East coastal region, you might be eligible for a phenomenal subsidy* to access these courses. To access this discount please type your postcode into the “coupon” field at checkout. If your postcode fall subsidised area, your ticket price will be reduced to $150 before you pay.

THIS WORKSHOP WILL

  • Provide the theory you need to get started in beekeeping
  • Discuss the importance of bees in our food systems, key threats to their health and how you can help them out
  • Show you three different types of hives – the langstrothwarre and top bar beehive and how they work so you can make an informed decision for your own place
  • Open a live hive so you can see how to manage and work with bees on a practical level
  • Introduce you to some of the simple and best tools to use as a beginner beekeeper

WHO SHOULD COME TO THIS WORKSHOP?

We’ve designed this workshop as an introduction for folks wanting to get started in growing keeping bees, and for people looking for some extra guidance in refining their beekeeping game. 

STUDENTS RECEIVE

  • Fully catered  – it’s going to be delicious,
  • Some solid time in the Okines’s Community Garden where you’ll see strategies you can apply to your small or large garden,
  • A bee veil,
  • A whole bunch of new bee friends and networks to stay in contact with, and
  • Course notes, jam-packed with information to support you to be a gun beekeeper!

CATERING

Our caterers will spoil you with food to fill your belly, warm your hearts and inspire you to grow your own. And, of course, we can accommodate any dietary requirements.

Nestled in the Southern Beaches community of Dodges Ferry, Okines Community Garden is an inspiring place to learn, share knowledge and contribute directly to the wellbeing of the land and the people it supports. The gardens consist of mature fruit trees, over 30 raised veggie beds, chickens, bees and an outdoor kitchen providing a hub for shared outdoor meals and a workshop space. ‘The Garden’ is connected to Okines Community House – which provides added space for learning and undercover workshop needs.

HOW DO I GET THERE?

You’ll be provided with clear directions on how to get there prior to the course.

YOUR TEACHERS

James DaCosta has worked on a huge range of small farms across Tasmanian including running the Hobart City Farm for 6 years (since closed). Originally from NW Tasmania, he was reared on the rich red soils of that region where he grew large and strong like a Kennebec (potato). He is a gardener, bee keeper, and permaculture designer. A natural teacher, James has a knack for inspiring and equipping people with the skills they need to get growing!

 

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Sonja Ralph comes from a botanical science and outdoor education background with a wealth of lived experience in gardening and permaculture principles. She is the Community Garden Coordinator at Okines Community Garden and is a passionate beekeeper, soap maker, fermenter, preserver, gardener, homeschooler, knitter, sourdough baker, naturalist, renovator, radical homemaker!

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Subsidies and Discounts

We have partnered with Okines to present this series of workshops for their region. Thanks to Okines, if you live in the Lower South East coast of Tasmania, you will qualify for a significant subsidy – each course will cost you just $150. We strongly encourage people living within the region to enrol, but these courses are also accessible to anyone that wants to join us! Areas that qualify for a subsidy extend from Sorell, to Swansea and down the coast to the whole peninsular, incorporating Dodges Ferry, Carlton, Primrose Sands and Dunalley.

*To get the discount, please enter your postcode in the “COUPON” section – if you are in a qualifying area, and it will automatically make your course $150.00.

**WANT TO LEARN EVERYTHING? Whether you are full-fee-paying or on the subsidised rate, if you purchase all 6 courses (see the full list below), you can get an extra 15% off the second series! To do this, buy the first three, then email us at admin@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we will give you the special code. Huzzah for accessible learning!

Sign up to the Okines Series and get skills!

Series A: Available to book now

  1. Introduction to Permaculture
  2. Super Soil Skills (take this with #3 to become a gun gardener)
  3. Grow Your Own Food (perfect followup to #2)

Series B:  An extra 15% off Series 2 if you purchase all 6 courses**

  1. Beekeeping for Beginners
  2. Homemade Herbal Remedies and soap
  3. The Fabulous World of Ferments

Looking for something else? We run lots of workshops – register your interest here and we’ll let you know what’s coming up.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family – alternatively you’re welcome to put it towards one of our future courses.

Covid-19

Please note, this workshop will be run in accordance to Covid-19 guidelines recommended at the time. If you are unwell with flu-like symptoms we ask you to please not attend the workshop – contact us beforehand to discuss options.

 

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Introduction to Permaculture: Okines #1

Join us for one day of exploration into permaculture. You’ll gain a solid introduction to permaculture foundations and the framework to design your life in your own home, in the city or out bush.

We’re partnering with Okines Community Garden in Dodges Ferry to bring you a special 6-part series of hands-on permaculture skills. This is workshop #1, Introduction to Permaculture. Immerse yourself in a proactive day of thinking, learning and exploring avenues to respond to some of the biggest social, environmental and economic challenges of our time in a proactive and positive way. Learn the basics in how you can apply permaculture to everything from house design, food production, energy systems and community development, all with a distinct Tasmanian flavour and focus.

If you live in the South-East coastal region, you might be eligible for a phenomenal subsidy* to access these courses. To access this discount please type your postcode into the “coupon” field at checkout. If your postcode fall subsidised area, your ticket price will be reduced to $150 before you pay.

Your permaculture course has completely changed my focus and approach towards my surroundings. I now have a clear vision and outlook of what I want to achieve In my garden and beyond. I have since been describing your course as a springboard. I left feeling inspired to continue learning more about permaculture and to take the first steps to creating a garden for my family to enjoy. 

YOU’LL GET TO LEARN ALL ABOUT…

  • Origins of permaculture and the global context
  • Permaculture ethics and principles
  • The permaculture design framework
  • Exploration of permaculture in action in urban and rural contexts.

STUDENTS RECEIVE

  • Fully catered  – it’s going to be delicious,
  • Some solid time in the Okines’s Community Garden where you’ll see strategies you can apply to your small or large garden,
  • A copy of the Introduction to Permaculture book by Bill Mollison,
  • Extensive course notes on everything we cover over the weekend, and
  • Skills and knowledge, useful for the rest of your life!

OUR TEACHING APPROACH

Just so you know, this is not a hands-on gardening course. This course is an engaging combination of theory and interactive group work. If you’re after a hands-on workshop have a look at what we have coming up here.

Two green thumbs up. Structure of the day, variety of delivery of information, engaging activities, amount of content covered, general warmth and enthusiasm all brilliant .

CATERING

Our caterers will spoil you with food to fill your belly, warm your hearts and inspire you to grow your own. And, of course, we can accommodate any dietary requirements.

Nestled in the Southern Beaches community of Dodges Ferry, Okines Community Garden is an inspiring place to learn, share knowledge and contribute directly to the wellbeing of the land and the people it supports. The gardens consist of mature fruit trees, over 30 raised veggie beds, chickens, bees and an outdoor kitchen providing a hub for shared outdoor meals and a workshop space. ‘The Garden’ is connected to Okines Community House – which provides added space for learning and undercover workshop needs.

HOW DO I GET THERE?

You’ll be provided with clear directions on how to get there prior to the course.

YOUR TEACHERS

Nadia Danti brings years of market gardening experience and has travelled the world working with some of the best growers out there to learn the skills she needed. Nadia is passionate about soil health and understanding the ecosystem under our feet, as well as supporting people to connect to their local food system and empowering them to grow some of their own food in whatever sized space they have!

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James DaCosta has worked on a huge range of small farms across Tasmanian including running the Hobart City Farm for 6 years (since closed). Originally from NW Tasmania, he was reared on the rich red soils of that region where he grew large and strong like a Kennebec (potato). He is a gardener, bee keeper, and permaculture designer. A natural teacher, James has a knack for inspiring and equipping people with the skills they need to get growing!

I found it very inspiring, lovely to spend a weekend with like minded people while learning more about how to live sustainably while still enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

I enjoyed the delivery of the workshop and particularly the constant interaction/exercises that took place between our small groups. Total involvement. Also liked discovering the principles of Permaculture and the connectivity that comes with it. Was useful for our private plans.

Fantastic , in general I’m not a great learner in a classroom setup but I was engaged and interested throughout the whole day

Brilliant! I had such a great day and left feeling motivated to keep learning.

 

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CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family – alternatively you’re welcome to put it towards one of our future courses.

Covid-19

Please note, this workshop will be run in accordance to Covid-19 guidelines recommended at the time. If you are unwell with flu-like symptoms we ask you to please not attend the workshop – contact us beforehand to discuss options.

Subsidies and Discounts

We have partnered with Okines to present this series of workshops for their region. Thanks to Okines, if you live in the Lower South East coast of Tasmania, you will qualify for a significant subsidy – each course will cost you just $150. We strongly encourage people living within the region to enrol, but these courses are also accessible to anyone that wants to join us! Areas that qualify for a subsidy extend from Sorell, to Swansea and down the coast to the whole peninsular, incorporating Dodges Ferry, Carlton, Primrose Sands and Dunalley.

*To get the discount, please enter your postcode in the “COUPON” section – if you are in a qualifying area, and it will automatically make your course $150.00.

**WANT TO LEARN EVERYTHING? Whether you are full-fee-paying or on the subsidised rate, if you purchase all 6 courses (see the full list below), you can get an extra 15% off the second series! To do this, buy the first three, then email us at admin@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we will give you the special code. Huzzah for accessible learning!

Sign up to the Okines Series and get skills!

Series A: Available to book now

  1. Introduction to Permaculture
  2. Super Soil Skills (take this with #3 to become a gun gardener)
  3. Grow Your Own Food (perfect followup to #2)

Series B: Coming soon – 15% off Series 2 if you purchase all 6 courses**

  1. Beekeeping for Beginners
  2. Eat your Harvest: Ferments and cheese making
  3. Homemade Herbal Remedies and soap

Looking for something else? We run lots of workshops – register your interest here and we’ll let you know what’s coming up.

 

 

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Portable Chicken Tractors

As our property is so steep, integrating animals into our food gardens hasn’t been able to happen as much as the permaculture text books imply it should. For example if I put our chickens into our orchard, they’d scratch all the mulch and top soil down to the bottom of the hill – and I would cry. It just wouldn’t work here. So we have some work arounds including using a chicken tractor to move chooks through out veggie patch strategically.

Chicken tractors are a useful tool to integrate chickens into your veggie garden in a controlled way where they don’t trash all your crops. We made a recent one out of scraps lying behind our shed. While it’s not going to win any prizes for craftsmanship or beauty, it does the job :-).

This past season, we’ve been using the chook tractor to help raise up some chicks we hatched. 

When do you put them in your garden?

The best time to activate the chook tractor in your garden is in between crops. So when one of our crops has been harvested but still has lots of green mater available, we pop the chook tractor on it and the chooks scratch, eat and peck it apart – until it’s blended back into nice looking mulchy soil. They also drop their manure which helps “feed: the soil. For those folks freaking out about fresh chook poo on the garden (usually not recommended as it’s very strong), a little bit is ok, so you can remain calm :-).

Popular chook tractor designs

Look, there’s heeeaaaps of chook tractor variations, such as did you know you can use an old trampoline and a-frame swing set as structures? Below are a couple outlined in more detail which I think are easy to build and are also portable.

The a-frame

One of the easier ones to build, the one you can see below is from an older rental house we lived in while in naarm/Melbourne. This version is built to be on either fresh grass or the veggie garden you can see behind it. Importantly it’s a light weight version and the chooks were put back into their main run and house each evening (which was also fox-proof). But during the day a couple could have a go at being in the tractor as needed.

The chook dome

The chook dome is designed to fit circular beds and popularised by permaculture author Linda Woodrow in her book ‘The Permaculture Home Garden’. It’s good for people with more flat land and interested in the mandala garden framework.

From DMK Permaculture

Purple Pear Farm mandala garden with chook dome peaking out in the corner. 

Key design considerations

While there are many design variations on the chicken tractor the portable versions all share some common design elements. Mainly…

  • They’re nice and light (or have wheels and handles) so one-two people can move them easily.
  • They’re made to fit the size of your veggie beds (or rows) so they’re 100% efficient and compact moving through the food garden. Sure you can just shuffle them around a grassy area, but it’s a wasted opportunity to integrate them into a food-producing system.
  • They all have a weather-proof shelter so the chooks can be protected from rain, the hot sun or predator birds which might want to come and get them.
  • There’s also a small roost for them to jump up and hang out/sleep on – imitate a tree’s branch (chooks are originally jungle birds).

Are they fox proof?

Usually no. We don’t have foxes in lutruwita/Tasmania or other predators in nipaluna/Hobart where I live, so we can be more relaxed about the design.

Do the chooks live there permanently?

Definitely not. They’re not big enough to keep chickens happy all the time. The exception is if you only a have a few in a large’ish tractor and you’re moving them daily (to fresh ground) and checking on them multiple times to make sure they’re happy. But generally the idea is that they’re visitors that come and go – returning to a larger, main yard where they can stretch their legs as desired. If for some reason they can’t be moved daily I make sure I dump lots of greens in there twice a day for them to eat and scratch up – you might also need to pop some straw/carbon in there as well to soak up their manure and make sure they have a healthy surface to be on.

Our chook tractor with a fresh load of comfrey leaves in there for them to eat

The main aim of the game is to build soil health in your food gardens and show the chooks a good time with fresh greens and grubs to eat. Done well, it’s a wonderful, symbiotic system where everyone wins.

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Free Home Composting Workshop: Hobart Feb

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

In collaboration with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce more free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a stinky, nasty pollutant.

 

BECAUSE….. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So if you compost your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost. Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

THIS WORKSHOP WILL COVER HOW TO COMPOST FOOD WASTE WITH:

  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles,
  • Compost worm farms,
  • and more!

YOUR VENUE

This workshop is being held at Mathers House at 108 Bathurst St, Hobart on a Sunday at the same time Farm Gate Market is happening directly out the front. Because of this you will be unable to drive directly to the front door. Instead, park in the Melville St carpark and walk across the road.

YOUR COMPOST TEACHER

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture and their lead educator and designers with *many* years of experience in composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold!

COVID-19

Please note, this workshop will be run in accordance to Covid-19 guidelines recommended at the time. If you are unwell with flu like symptoms we ask you to please not attend the workshop – please contact us beforehand to notify us if this is the case so we can pass on your place to someone else.

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How To “Un-Cluck” Your Clucky Chook

Each year in or around spring, between 1-6 of our chooks will get clucky. This simply means they’ll stay in the nesting box sitting on any available eggs and try to hatch them. A futile activity at our place as we have no rooster. The reason why this is problematic comes down to two things:

  1. Once they go clucky they’ll stop laying eggs. This is the key reason we have chooks, so it’s not ideal when lots of them are on the cluck.
  2. Their clucky energy and presence in the nesting box freaks out the other chooks (who aren’t clucky) who can then also stop laying eggs. Meaning we’ve gone from having 8 eggs a day to 2. And the two eggs that are laid are laid in strange and hard to get to places every day (like under the goat’s milking stand) because they’re busy avoiding the clucky hen in the nesting box.

The two main ways to break the clucky cycle are to:

(a) Place some fertile eggs beneath them and wait for a few weeks for them to hatch. They’ll then fulfil their parenting dreams and the cycle will be broken. We’ve done this with one of our clucky hens and currently have six fluff balls running around with their mumma. But there’s only so many baby chicks you need.

The other way is…

(b) Manually break their clucky-ness by isolating them in a safe, yet less comfortable space to inspire them abandon the nest. This is how we do it.

Remove them from the main nesting box and house so the other chooks can reclaim that space and remember how to lay eggs again. We moved ours to a seperate space within our goat shed where she want be disturbed (by goats). This area is completely weather and predator proof.

We use a recycled milk crate to contain her on a timber pallet shelf (weighted down with rocks and tied with some twine so she can’t push it over) with lots of airflow and no straw to nest on. You don’t want to give them a cosy bed to keep nesting on as they’ll just happily keep being clucky.

The timber shelf allows maximum airflow

We also make sure there’s easy access to food and water – the milk crates are handy as they have large holes she can poke her head through for this.

Then we leave her there for 2 – 3 days, checking on her regularly morning and night. When you do release her watch to see what happens – if she heads straight back to the main nesting box, then she’s not ready – give her another 24 hours. But if she starts wondering around and re-integrating with the rest of the flock, then the cycle has been broken.

Some folks say this is a bit rough, and I hear you. But what’s even rougher is having all your chooks go clucky, not getting any eggs and then having to buy in eggs from elsewhere with potentially unknown animal-handling practices which may be extremely unethical and sad. I’d much prefer to be able to manage the clucky cycle as outlined above and know where my animals products are coming from – and that they’re being cared for ethically.

This relatively quick process will see your chooks back in the saddle of egg laying and not freaking each other out with strange clucky vibes :-).

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Permaculture Design Course

A  Permaculture Design Course To Get You (& Others) Living The Good Life.

We hold our Permaculture Design Course once a year. If you’d like to be the first to hear about our new dates, register your interest here and we’ll be in touch once we’ve got it locked in. Cheers!

What people are saying about this course….

Thanks a bunch!! You guys are incredible at what you do. I’ve made so many connections in so many ways. I’m very grateful to you all (Nat).

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Thank you so much to you all. I was (am) quite emotional at the end of it! The PDC was just what I needed at this time. I leave filled with overwhelming gratitude and promise! (Bonnie).

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Thank you for such a wonderful and inspiring experience, it was a privilege to be a part of it! Amazing teachers and participants both (Erin).

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Such a wonderful life-changing experience – love, love, love and thank you, thank you, thank you to you all (Sue).

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Inspiring. Empowering. Life changing. I feel like the course brought together so many big picture things I had been worrying about and gave me a framework not only to make sense of them but to do something about it. This transformation from focussing on problems to having a positive and practical way to move forward is so awesome. I feel totally inspired to live in a more connected way, starting with my home and community, knowing that some amazing positive changes can flow on from this. Also great to connect with a bunch of likeminded people. So much fun. Thank you (Jessamy)..

Keen? Register your interest here.

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How To Cook & Preserve Globe Artichokes

Globe artichokes (Cynara scolymus) are part of the thistle family – so in the right climate, they grow like weeds. Beautiful, delicious (non-invasive) weeds.

We’ve planted a lot of them amongst our edible forest garden as a stunning (and tasty) perennial. When it comes to eating them, it can initially be a tad confusing about how to cook or preserve them. When I first started trying to eat these plants, I remember boiling them for far too long and then kind of just mauling them – and being super disappointed and baffled – but friends, times have changed. Here’s how we most commonly eat and preserve them – I hope it helps you avoid the baffled mauling I initially did!

How to eat them…

  • We harvest the flower buds when they’re young – before their petals have opened, or are only just slightly open.
  • We either boil or steam them in a big pot of water and cook them until you can easily stick a fork or butter knife through them.
  • We then serve them up like that with a side bowl dipping sauce – I like to use olive oil and lemon juice (there’s many variations to this dipping sauce).
  • Simply peel the petals one by one, dip them into the sauce and using your teeth, scrap the fleshy bit of the petal off.
  • Eventually you get to the squishy heart – which you can can whole.
  • You end up with a big bowl of half eaten petals (you can’t eat the tough bit) which you can then compost.

But there’s only so many artichokes you can eat, which is where preserving comes in handy.

How to preserve them…

  • Harvest the buds while young (as described above) and bring them into your kitchen.
  • Top and tail them and seen below.

Top and tail the artichokes.

Then remove the outer (tougher) petals as these won’t soften and are mostly not edible.

I then chop them in half as this is the size I like to eat them in once they’re preserved. It’s also helpful to make all the pieces a similar size so they cook at the same rate.

For some of the larger flower buds they may have developed a spiky fur inside. The younger buds can have a softer (non offensive) version of this which you can see forming above (edible and delicious – don’t worry about it).

But for the older buds – you want to get rid of all the spiky stuff you can see below…

I use a spoon and scoop it out. See before photo above and after photo below.

The same heart can be seen below – just chopped in half ready to be cooked. You can see the spiky fur stuff I’ve scooped out to the right – compost it.

Hot tip

If you’re preserving LOTS of artichokes, have a bowl of water and vinegar (or lemon juice) you can soak them in while they wait for you to be ready to cook them. This will stop them from going a yucky brown colour.

Once you’re ready, pop them in a pot with water and a steamer and cook until their soft enough for a fork to go through them easily.

The vinegar bit…

While they’re cooking, it’s time to make a vinegar solution which is what will actually preserve them on the shelf. You’ll need:

  • Apple cider vinegar – enough to fill the jars you’re planning on stuffing with artichokes.
  • Rosemary (to taste)
  • Garlic (to taste)
  • Bay leaves (to taste)
  • Peppercorns (to taste)

Mix them all into a pot, bring to the boil and then let it simmer while the artichokes are cooking.

Once the artichokes have finished

Pop them straight into sterilised glass jars and pour the vinegar solution over them so every bit is covered. Either screw the lid of the jar on, or use a fowler vacola lid system* and store on the shelf until your’e ready to eat. I recommend leaving them for at least a week so they have good flavour.

One more thing. I get a lot of people saying to me – why do you even bother doing this? You only get such a little product from a huge plant – isn’t this wasteful?? True. Like many delicious food things, it takes effort, time and the actual globe artichoke heart is approximately 1% of the plant that you grow. I grow/eat/preserve them because they’re so prolific in their growth (remember they’re related to thistles) and so abundant in their yields that it makes it very worth while. Also it’s just so yum!

*This isn’t compulsory, we just happen to have lots of these jars so are using them. 

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Small Farm Design

Join Hannah Moloney and Nick Ritar at Fat Pig Farm for one day of focused learning in how to design a productive small farm – so when you set your own up, you get it right first time round! 

Sold out! But pop your name on our wait list here and we’ll be in touch is a place comes up. 

Who should come along?

We’ve designed this workshop for hobby farmers and folks looking to embark on a small-hold commercial venture and are looking to get the foundation design right before they start digging dams and holes for fence posts.

This workshop will cover

  • Design framework – based on permaculture design.
  • Reading the landscape so you put the right thing in the right place.
  • Water systems, including dams, swales and keyline methods.
  • Grazing management
  • Fencing to keep animals in and/or out.
  • Weed control
  • Fire safety
  • Perennial plants including grasses and trees to restore stability.
  • Soil remediation for thriving landscapes.

Your teachers

Hannah Moloney runs Good Life Permaculture where she’s the lead educator and permaculture designer. Over the past 8 years she’s designed countless small-large farms throughout Tasmania to be productive, resilient and darn beautiful – all while ensuring that the design is intimately integrated with the people living/working on the land.

She also keeps busy with her own large urban homestead in the heart of Hobart. You can read more about Hannah here and here. 

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Nick Ritar is Milkwood’s primary design and education consultant. Nick is passionate about authentic outcomes for students studying permaculture and life skills, and cultivating community.

He spends his time growing good food, keeping bees, cultivating mushrooms, teaching permaculture design & advocating for community-scale resilience. You can read more about Nick here. 

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Catering

This workshop includes delicious and nutritious lunch from the Fat Pig Farm kitchen. You’ll feast on seasonal produce straight from their farm. We can’t really describe how good their food is (it’s really good), so you’ll just have to come try it.

VENUE

We’re holding this workshop at Fat Pig Farm in Glaziers Bay. Where is that exactly? The venue address and details of the venue will be shared with students closer to the workshop.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

Covid-19

Please note, this workshop will be run in accordance to Covid-19 guidelines recommended at the time. If you are unwell with flu like symptoms we ask you to please not attend the workshop – contact us beforehand to discuss options.

Looking to learn other hands-on skills?

We run lots of workshops – register your interest here and we’ll let you know what’s coming up.

Sold out! But pop your name on our wait list here and we’ll be in touch is a place comes up. 

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Goat Workshop

A workshop for people wanting to keep goats holistically, productively and consciously.

Sold out! Pop your name on our wait list to snaffle any spare spots.

Join Jilly Middleton and Hannah Moloney at Fat Pig Farm to learn about keeping goats naturally. Based on their lived experience, this workshop will provide tips, tricks and depth of information you simply can’t find in the books, or on goat forums (trust me, we’ve tried).

THIS WORKSHOP WILL COVER

  • Keeping goats to manage farm weeds, i.e. blackberries and gorse,

  • Raising goats to be hardy and low maintenance,
  • Domestic goat keeping: Keeping goats in urban or small areas,
  • Wholistic goat care,
  • What to feed your goats,
  • Breeding goats,
  • Fencing, and
  • So much more!

PARTICIPANTS RECEIVE

  • Theoretical information and discussion on everything goats,
  • Tour of goats in action on the farm,
  • Delicious and nutritious lunch from Fat Pig Farm,
  • Course notes, tailored for the Tasmanian context, and
  • New networks and goat friends to connect with into the future.

TEACHING TEAM

Jilly Middleton runs Twelve Trees Farm in Cygnet – an organic blueberry farm. While she currently has no goats on her farm, she spent 7 years farming goats naturally for meat, milk and to manage a range of weeds on her farm include gorse and blackberries. She is a wealth of practical knowledge and has a rare depth of information on everything goat.

She recently sold her goat herd to Fat Pig Farm where they now spend their days eating blackberries. You can see her talking goats with Matthew Evans talking  on a recent episode of The Gourmet Farmer here.

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Hannah Moloney runs Good Life Permaculture where she’s the lead educator and permaculture designer. For the past two years, she’s also been doting on two toggenburg goats – one of which she milks daily in central Hobart. She brings the unique experience of urban goat keeping, has worked through numerous challenges of sourcing food, health and fencing. All of this can be applied to any domestic “house goat context” in both rural and (some) urban locations.

 

FOOD

This workshop includes delicious and nutritious lunch from the Fat Pig Farm kitchen. You’ll feast on seasonal produce straight from their farm. We can’t really describe how good their food is (it’s really good), so you’ll just have to come try it.

VENUE

We’re holding this workshop at Fat Pig Farm in Glaziers Bay. Fat Pig Farm have their own herd of goats which students get to see in action. Bred by Jilly around the corner on her own farm, these goats have been trained to eat weeds, specifically gorse and blackberries.

Where’s Fat Pig Farm? The exact location of the venue will be shared with students closer to the workshop.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

Covid-19

Please note, this workshop will be run in accordance to Covid-19 guidelines recommended at the time. If you are unwell with flu like symptoms we ask you to please not attend the workshop – contact us beforehand to discuss options.

Looking to learn other hands-on skills?

We run lots of workshops – register your interest here and we’ll let you know what’s coming up.

Sold out! Pop your name on our wait list to snaffle any spare spots.

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DIY Duck Feeder & Watering System

At the beginning of the Covid lockdown for Tasmania this year, we scrambled for home projects for our little 5 year old Frida while her kindy was shut and landed on a few things including hatching Indian Runner duck eggs which we had been thinking of re-introducing into our garden for a while.

We sourced 12 eggs from a friend, made an incubator to keep them warm for 28 days and waited. Out of the 12 only 2 turned out to be fertile (that happens sometimes). Both hatched and we met Star Bright Shimmer and his very weak sibling Marison (named by Frida of course). Marison was born with only one working leg and was lack lustre from day dot. And yet we adored her, she lived for 2 months before dying (this happens sometimes). We buried her in our garden and planted flowers on top – Frida is beautifully attentive to these plants and sometimes I catch her singing to Marison at her grave. So much unexpected learning and conversations about life, death and love when we just thought we were hatching ducklings.

Star Bright Shimmer – the most beautiful.

While this was all happening Star Bright Shimmer imprinted himself onto Frida which means he legitimately thinks Frida’s his mum and will follow her anywhere. And while he now strictly only lives outside, there was a while there where Star Bright was an inside duck and the bathroom sink his personal bath. Sounds sweet, but the smell, the mess – so much poo!

We sourced Star Bright two girl ducks for company from a farm – Dandy and Daisy, we have no idea who is who but we’re ok with that. As we didn’t hand raise them they are completely uninterested in us, except when we feed them. Star Bright continues to be Frida’s true love and will clamber all over us at every opportunity.

We keep our ducks fenced in our young olive orchard as they’re enormously destructive to annual gardens. Between their bills snuffling under little plants, copious amounts of poo being splashed around and their big flat feet they can demolish whole annual crops and compact the soil while they’re at it. But in an orchard or established food forest, they’re perfect.

Ducks are messy creatures. They specifically like to poo in water – we have a bath pond for them which we empty as needed and drain onto a nearby food forest. You can see a much older blog about that system here.  

The feeding & watering system

I’ve struggled to find an effective water and feeding system for them that I can build easily myself. But recently found this DIY bucket system which contains all the food and water and stops them from walking and pooing in it all.

All you need is two 20 Litre buckets, I sourced mine from a local wholefoods shop for free once they’ve finished with them – ask your local cafe or bakery if they have any spare.

Using a jigsaw, I cut three holes into the sides of the bucket – one for each of my three ducks. The holes are approximately 20cm from the ground height, ensuring the ducks can reach in and touch the bottom of the bucket with their bills.

I then fill one with water and the other with pellets for them to eat.

Importantly, you should still expect the water to be very dirty at the end of the day. This is because ducks use water to keep their eyes and bills clean. As they’re constantly foraging beneath mulch and soil all day for slugs and grubs, they keep clean by frequently dunking their head in water. So there’ll be a fair bit of dirt in the water still – nothing to worry about.

So far -this is the best and easiest DIY method I’ve found for ducks. I can move the buckets around easily preventing one patch of earth becoming an absolute compacted mess, they prevent duck food being wasted and keep all poo out. All is well in duck universe :-).

More duck resources

 

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