Posts tagged ‘good life permaculture’

Permaculture Design Course

18 January – 1 February, 2019, Dodges Ferry, Southern Tasmania

Two weeks of deep permaculture design learning. You’ll walk away with the skills and knowledge to design resilient, robust landscapes for urban and rural environments – all in the name of living a good life!

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

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I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita).

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…

  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design

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Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha).

Great! A life changing experience and a very good start for living a more conscious life and be the change (Maria).

 

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, urban gardeners, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do get our hands dirty either fermenting food or getting into the garden. This means that while we will cover a large range of practical topis (i.e. building, gardening), we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

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Inspiring. Empowering. Life changing. I feel like the course brought together so many big picture things I had been worrying about and gave me a framework not only to make sense of them but to do something about it. This transformation from focussing on problems to having a positive and practical way to move forward is so awesome. I feel totally inspired to live in a more connected way, starting with my home and community, knowing that some amazing positive changes can flow on from this. Also great to connect with a bunch of likeminded people. So much fun. Thank you (Jessamy).

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As part of your course fee you receive…

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  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • Course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Permaculture Australia
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

“So wonderfully inspiring- the most practical and enlightening course I’ve ever done :)” Lucy.

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The Teaching Team

YOUR LEAD TEACHER: Hannah Moloney is a  permaculture designer who works with urban and rural land holders to design landscapes that beautiful, abundant and resilient.  When not designing, she’s running community development projects and teaching permaculture in Tasmania and nationally with Milkwood Permaculture. 

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke. In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

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SUPPORT TEACHER: Nick Towle is a passionate advocate for sustainability and permaculture and brings a diverse set of skills to the course including home-based sustainability practices and community economic systems. His most recent permaculture adventure has involved establishing the RESEED Trust, a two acre urban property in the heart of Penguin (NW Tasmania) which is being developed into a permaculture demonstration site and sustainability education centre.

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TEACHER: Penny Milburn comes from a background in corporate responsibility, working with the Department of Environment and Climate Change NSW, establishing Environmental Management Systems and measuring the carbon footprint of organisations such as New Zealand Post. Her focus shifted to permaculture in 2008 after completing a PDC with Bill Mollison and Geoff Lawton. She has been a qualified teacher of Accredited Permaculture Training with The National Environment Centre since 2012, with students across Australia and in countries such as Italy, Samoa and Japan. Penny has a wealth of teaching and hands on experience, currently maintaining a productive15 acre permaculture property in the Huon Valley.

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GUEST TEACHER: Anton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist with experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development and energy efficiency.  Anton completed his Environmental Science degree at the ANU in Canberra and GDip at the University of Sydney.  His areas of study included Human Ecology, Geography and Agro-ecology.  His research Thesis was on understanding energy flows through urban agricultural systems.  Since then he has worked with The Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Tasmania’s very own Sustainable Living Tasmania.  In addition to his deep professional experience he has a wealth of knowledge of practical sustainability, from off-grid solar power, carpentry, and landscaping to brewing, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

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Thanks for being awesome! Thanks also for the shared life-experiences/knowledge of the teachers. One thing that really stood-out for me was the “people care” of the students, and everyone really, throughout the two weeks. I have never before experienced this in the many workshops, courses and places of learning/study that I have attended. My wish is that such a thing becomes the “normal” way of being – YEAH!

Venue

We’re holding this course at the vibrant Okines Community House and garden in Dodges Ferry, southern Tasmania. This active community hub features a food co-op, beautiful community garden, a pizza oven and is located near a local surf beach – it’s a rocking place!

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Accommodation

We provide free camping (BYO all your own gear) onsite with access to toilets, showers and inside spaces to relax in.

If you’d prefer to not camp, there are also local places you can stay independently, have a look at a large selection herehere and here. 

One Full PDC Scholarship on Offer!

In the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to someone who really needs it. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

All applications should address these two points, click here to apply. Applications close Nov 1st, 2019.

Catering

We provide nutritious and delicious vegetarian food for the entire course and can cater for a large range of dietary needs with wholesome, locally sourced and organic food where possible.

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How to get to the PDC

Dodges Ferry is approximately 45 minutes from Hobart and 30 minutes from the Hobart airport.

  • By Boat: If you’re coming from Melbourne, Victoria – you can catch the boat (a 12 hour journey) from Port Melbourne to Devonport. From Devonport it is a 4 hour drive to Dodges Ferry.  To see the timetable and book your ticket visit the Spirit of Tasmania
  • By bus: There are regular buses traveling from Hobart to Dodges Ferry, check out the timetable here.
  • By plane: The closest airports to Dodges Ferry is the Hobart airport. Check out the webjet website to find the most affordable deal. To get to Dodges Ferry from the airport your options are to hire a car, or talk to us about organising a carpooling arrangement with a fellow student or a possible bulk pick up.

Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

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It was amazing! More than what I hoped for. So grateful to have had the opportunity to learn from Hannah and the team! (Manuela).

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full be the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can talk details.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

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How To Make Bees Wax Wraps!

We’ve been using beeswax wraps for quite a while now and like them so much we decided to start making our own.  We’ve tried two approaches, the first just 100% beeswax from our beehives and the second with beeswax, pine resin and olive oil.  The wax and resin makes a  better wrap, albeit with a bit more work… Tally ho, here’s what we did.

Beeswax is harvested from our bees.  We melt the harvested wax with water then sieve through a sieve then muslin.  Let set and drain off the water, This leaves fairly clean beeswax. You can also just go buy some.

That yucky wax and cappings and occasionally dead bee turns into clean wax, ready to be grated.

Frida – getting in on the action 🙂

100% Beeswax Wrap

We experimented with simply grating beeswax on some cloth and putting it in the oven.  Simple, a beeswax wrap.

This works, however it’s as sticky as we’d like it, being unable to mould and stick to complex shapes.  That said its good enough to keep a blue cheese in a carefully colour-coded blue wrap.

The Pine Resin (rosen) Wrap

Enter the beeswax and resin wrap.  Mixing beeswax, pine resin and a bit of olive oil creates a superior wrap.  The method is fairly strait forward.

  • 5 parts beeswax
  • 5 parts rosin
  • 1 part olive oil

Pine Resin is  the sap of pine trees that is used as part of its healing process.  You can harvest your own which we tried by visiting various pine trees in the hood and scraping dried globules of wax.  It was pretty slow going for me (not that many pine trees around here) and harvested around 50 grams in an hour.  At some point, I decided to go and buy some from the art supply store for $50 for 500 grams. Enough to last us a loooong time.

The wax, resin and olive oil is is placed in a jar or saucepan in a double boiler (another saucepan of water).  It takes a few hours for the whole mass to incorporate.  The pine resin forms a toffee like texture for a while before dissolving into the wax.

Once the mixture is melted and combined it can be used immediately or stored for later, simply re-melt at a later point.

Fun Fact – beeswax and pine resin makes ….pine salve, apparently good for wounds and abrasions

The fabric.  We searched the material box and also scoured the tip-shop for nice cotton scraps (thanks to our friend Tom who works there).  We washed the cotton and dried each piece of material.

To apply the wax mixture we used a paint brush to paint onto the cotton.  Under each section of cotton we put some greaseproof paper to stop it sticking to the table.

On some materials the wax mixture did not penetrate the material.  We placed each wrap in the oven at 100 degrees C for around 5 minutes.  This let the wax mix fully into the wrap.

Afterwards we trimmed the rough edges of the wraps to clean them up a bit

How cool is this stuff.  Its tacky, its sticky, it moulds to shape and holds in place.  Oh, it smells kinda nice too, a bit like a sauna 😊  Maybe we should make some for christmas presents?

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Free Compost Workshop in August

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

After a successful 2017 where we delivered The Home Composting Project with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce another round of free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

Why compost? Because…. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So by composting your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost. Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

This workshop will cover how to compost food waste with:
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  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.
  • Plus – Hannah will answer any questions you have about other systems too.

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Your compost teacher

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold!

We’re also running these free compost workshops in September and October. 

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Introduction To Permaculture

Join us for one day of exploration into permaculture. You’ll gain a solid understanding in permaculture foundations and the framework to design your own home in the city or out bush.

Immerse yourself in a proactive day of thinking, learning and exploring avenues to respond to some of the biggest social, environmental and economic challenges of our time in a proactive and positive way. Learn the basics in how you can apply permaculture to everything from house design, food production, energy systems and community development, all with a distinct Tasmanian flavour and focus.

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Your permaculture course has completely changed my focus and approach towards my surroundings. I now have a clear vision and outlook of what I want to achieve In my garden and beyond. I have since been describing your course as a springboard. I left feeling inspired to continue learning more about permaculture and to take the first steps to creating a garden for my family to enjoy.

This course coversgrow-comm-garden-design-ap-2016-ilovepdf-compressed-724x1024

  • Origins of permaculture and the global context
  • Permaculture ethics and principles
  • The permaculture design framework
  • Exploration of permaculture in action in urban and rural contexts.

Students receive

  • A copy of the Introduction to Permaculture book by Bill Mollison,
  • Morning and afternoon tea/refreshments
  • Course notes, and
  • New friends and networks.

 

Our teaching approach

We draw on a range of theoretical, interactive and hands-on methods in our teaching style with the intention to make sure our students are engaged and that we’re delivering information as thoroughly as possible. This course is approximately 40% theoretical and 60% interactive (group work and facilitated exercises). This is not a gardening course, if you’re after a hands-on workshop have a look at what we have coming up here. 

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Your teacher

img_5913-2-293x300Hannah Moloney works as a professional permaculture landscape designer and educator. She grew up on a city farm in Brisbane growing herbs and has over 15 years of hands-on experience in designing, building and managing projects around urban agriculture, small-scale farming, permaculture and community development, including co-founding the Hobart City Farm. She has a post-grad diploma in community cultural development, a diploma in permaculture and since 2009, has been teaching permaculture across Australia. She’s had the pleasure of learning from Rosemary Morrow,  Dr Elaine Ingham and David Holmgren. In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of teaching alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke.

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 I found it very inspiring, lovely to spend a weekend with like minded people while learning more about how to live sustainably while still enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

Venue

We’re holding this course at the Sustainable Learning Centre in Mt Nelson, Hobart. We’ll provide all details on how to get there for our students just before the course.

Cancellation policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

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How To Rodent-Proof Your Compost Bin

If you’ve got unwanted rodents living in your compost bin a simple and effective way of keeping them out is by adding vermin mesh onto the bottom of it.

Vermin mesh (aka rodent mesh)  is made from thick wire (around 2mm) and has small squares that baby rodents can’t squeeze through. While it does start to rust after 5 years or so, it’s an effective way of composting food scraps without inviting all the rodents in your neighbourhood to move in at the same time.

Vermin mesh

The first step is to pick up some vermin mesh from your local hardware shop – we got it in a roll of 5m as we know we’ll use it for bits and pieces around our property. Some shops will sell it by the metre – just call around until you find the best place.

Roll it out, place your compost bin on top of it and cut off the right amount you need, keeping a few inches available around the whole bin.

Next up, cut the vermin mesh into a rough circle shape and then simply start folding the mesh over the edges of the compost bin.

I used my boots to help press it down firmly. It doesn’t have to be perfect – just strong enough that it grips onto the edge, which is really easy. You want to be able to take it off again (when your compost’s mature) so I made it reasonably loose.

And that’s it! So quick and easy. The only tools you need are some good wire cutters.

From here you can locate your compost bin somewhere convenient in your garden. We’ve placed ours near our chooks and goats who we feed every morning, this makes it easy for us to place food scraps in there on the same trip – effeciency plus!

You can also dig the compost bin into the soil 200mm to create another barrier to the rodents from getting in – but generally the vermin mesh is enough to do the job. 

As you can see below, we’ve got a second bin with a lid on it to store dry carbon materials. This makes it easy for us to add a small bucket of carbon with each bucket of food scraps that goes in. We also make sure we chop up our food scrasp to the size of a 20 cent coin to help them break down more quickly.

For something that take less than an hour to do, you’ll be kicking yourself you didn’t do this years ago. Happy rodent-free composting!

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Compost Workshop in June!

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

After a successful 2017 where we delivered The Home Composting Project with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce a second round of free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

SPACES ARE LIMITED, REGISTER TODAY!

BECAUSE….. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So if you compost your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost! Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

This workshop will cover how to compost food waste with:
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  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.

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Your compost teacher

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold!

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Holistic Decision Making

Join Dan Palmer for one day of Holistic Decision Making!

Holistic Decision Making (HDM) is an approach to making great things happen in a way that increases quality of life for all involved. When we make decisions holistically, we:

  • get real clear on what we really want, on what quality of life means for us
  • use the power of the decisions we make (large and small) to move toward this without unintentional social, ecological or financial stuff-ups
  • seek and use feedback to stay on track

VEG workshopIn doing so, life and life projects start feel less like that things that are happening to you (or dragging you along for the ride) into things that you are intentionally doing or living. At the same time, you start shedding the parts of your life that are not authentic or don’t really belong and both strengthening and adding those that do. Once you get a taste for it, it is hard to turn back.

Holistic decision making can be applied to yourself, your family, any business or project you are part of. We apply it to all of these things and more.

Though appropriate for anyone working in any decision-making context, in this workshop, held in Cygnet, a region rich in farmers, we invite both farmers and non-farmers. Dan will be sure to cater to small farmers feeling like they’d like a better system for driving their enterprise forward with better decision making.

This workshop will cover:

  • The entire approach clearly explained using real life examples, games and practical exercises. Holistic Management Workshop 1
  • Creating what we call a ‘context’ for yourself, your family or an organisation/business you are part of that captures deepest values, mission and desires along with what must be done and nurtured to achieve them.
  • Using that context to filter decisions and take actions based on their relevance to this context.
  • Seeking and using feedback to actualise, maintain, and evolve your context.

Holistic decision making is something Dan finds invaluable and integral in his personal and family life, and also in his work as a permaculture designer and educator.

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“Life changing … you won’t be disappointed” ~ Fiona

“The holistic management system is probably the most useful tool I have ever been given which I have used mostly for personal/ family blossoming and could use in so many more ways”  ~ Amandine 
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You can get a feel for this approach here.

Dan Palmer is deeply passionate about this topic and uses a variety of facilitation tools to create an adaptive space in which all participants give each other permission to share openly and to support each other in understanding then applying the holistic management framework.

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“Going through the holistic management process was priceless for both personal life and a future business. Using that approach changes everything and gives me a lot of confidence going forward” ~ Erica

Dan Palmer, was candid, encouraging and focused; helping each person get clarity on where they were at and what they could do to simultaneously achieve their goals and be more aligned with their values” ~ Amanda

“Very, very useful for achieving focus and the motivation behind my idea – recommend it to everyone” ~ Michelle

About Dan Palmer

Retrosuburbia is hereDan is co-founder of PermablitzLandedLiving Design ProcessHolistic Decision MakingMaking Permaculture Stronger and  Very Edible Gardens. He has a PhD in systems thinking and contagious levels of enthusiasm for what it is he’s decided to do with his life. He currently lives with his wife and two daughters in a small home in Castlemaine.

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Venue

We’re holding this workshop in central Cygnet, all details will be provided to students closer to the workshop .

Cancellation Policy

There are no refunds available for this course. If you can’t make it, we encourage you to pass your place onto a friend or family member who can.

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How To Make Ravioli

Home made ravioli is wonderfully simple. Ignore anyone who tells you that you need fancy equipment or ingredients – seriously. They are not helping you live your best life.

This is how we make ours. 

First we make a pasta dough – read how we do this other really simple process here. 

Pasta dough is simply eggs and flour – these days we use 100% buckwheat flour. 

While the dough’s resting in the fridge we make the filling. This can be pretty much anything you like. For this batch we made the filling from roast pumpkin, goats fetta and wild greens – all from the garden.

Importantly, we whizz the ingredients all up together as this helps them bind and the whole package is less likely to fall apart.

Some people do a meat based filler, others vegan – anything will work as long as it has good moisture content and isn’t too bulky (hence whizzing it up).

Put the mixture to one side while you get the pasta dough back out of the fridge (where it’s been resting for at least 20 mins).

Roll the dough out until its around 2mm thick (or thinner if your dough can handle it). You can roll it through a pasta machine if you have one, or just roll it by hand with a rolling pin (a wine bottle also works brilliantly).

Lay the sheets of pasta out on the table and cut them into rough sections with a butter knife. They don’t have to be exact at all – in fact the roughness of the shapes is part of their beauty.

Next up, put a big teaspoon’s worth of filling onto each section as shown below.

Have a cup of water nearby so you can dip your fingers in and gently moisten the edge of the pasta around the filling – not too much otherwise it’ll desolve into a bad mess.

Then you can fold each pasta section in half and press down the edges with a fork so it binds together – and looks pretty.

Now you’re ready to cook them. Bring a big pot of water to the boil and plop them all in. They’ll automatically sink when you first put them in, once they float (after a few minutes or so), they’re ready, Strain the hot water off them and eat immediately with your favourite tomato or herb sauce.

And that’s it!

Yes, it does take a bit longer than buying instand pasta or ravioli, but the taste will ensure you never go back. Life is too short for crap food.

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Compost Workshop in May!

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

After a successful 2017 where we delivered The Home Composting Project with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce a second round of free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

SPACES ARE LIMITED – BOOK TODAY!

BECAUSE….. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So if you compost your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost! Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

This workshop will cover how to compost food waste with:
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  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.

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Your compost teacher

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold!

Leave a comment

Compost Workshop in April

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

After a successful 2017 where we delivered The Home Composting Project with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce a second round of free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

BECAUSE….. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So if you compost your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost! Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

This workshop will cover how to compost food waste with:
DSF4994-2-1024x682-1024x682

  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.

.

Your compost teacher

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold!

Leave a comment