Posts tagged ‘good life permaculture’

The Goat Workshop

A workshop for people wanting to keep goats holistically, productively and consciously.

Join Jilly Middleton and Hannah Moloney at Fat Pig Farm to learn about keeping goats naturally. Based on their lived experience, this workshop will provide tips, tricks and depth of information you simply can’t find in the books, or on goat forums (trust me, we’ve tried).

THIS WORKSHOP WILL COVER

  • Keeping goats to manage farm weeds, i.e. blackberries and gorse,

  • Raising goats to be hardy and low maintenance,
  • Domestic goat keeping: Keeping goats in urban or small areas,
  • Wholistic goat care,
  • What to feed your goats,
  • Breeding goats,
  • Fencing, and
  • So much more!

PARTICIPANTS RECEIVE

  • Theoretical information and discussion on everything goats,
  • Tour of goats in action on the farm,
  • Delicious and nutritious lunch from Fat Pig Farm,
  • Course notes, tailored for the Tasmanian context, and
  • New networks and goat friends to connect with into the future.

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TEACHING TEAM

Jilly Middleton runs Twelve Trees Farm in Cygnet – an organic blueberry farm. While she currently has no goats on her farm, she spent 7 years farming goats naturally for meat, milk and to manage a range of weeds on her farm include gorse and blackberries. She is a wealth of practical knowledge and has a rare depth of information on everything goat.

She recently sold her goat herd to Fat Pig Farm where they now spend their days eating blackberries. You can see her talking goats with Matthew Evans talking  on a recent episode of The Gourmet Farmer here.

Hannah Moloney runs Good Life Permaculture where she’s the lead educator and permaculture designer. For the past two years, she’s also been doting on two toggenburg goats – one of which she milks daily in central Hobart. She brings the unique experience of urban goat keeping, has worked through numerous challenges of sourcing food, health and fencing. All of this can be applied to any domestic “house goat context” in both rural and (some) urban locations.

 

FOOD

This workshop includes delicious and nutritious lunch from the Fat Pig Farm kitchen. You’ll feast on seasonal produce straight from their farm. We can’t really describe how good their food is (it’s really good), so you’ll just have to come try it.

VENUE

We’re holding this workshop at Fat Pig Farm in Glaziers Bay. Fat Pig Farm have their own herd of goats which students get to see in action. Bred by Jilly around the corner on her own farm, these goats have been trained to eat weeds, specifically gorse and blackberries.

Where’s Fat Pig Farm? The exact location of the venue will be shared with students closer to the workshop.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

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Introduction to Permaculture

Join us for one day of exploration into permaculture. You’ll gain a solid introduction to permaculture foundations and the framework to design your own home in the city or out bush.

Immerse yourself in a proactive day of thinking, learning and exploring avenues to respond to some of the biggest social, environmental and economic challenges of our time in a proactive and positive way. Learn the basics in how you can apply permaculture to everything from house design, food production, energy systems and community development, all with a distinct Tasmanian flavour and focus..

Your permaculture course has completely changed my focus and approach towards my surroundings. I now have a clear vision and outlook of what I want to achieve In my garden and beyond. I have since been describing your course as a springboard. I left feeling inspired to continue learning more about permaculture and to take the first steps to creating a garden for my family to enjoy.

THIS COURSE COVERS

  • Origins of permaculture and the global context
  • Permaculture ethics and principles
  • The permaculture design framework
  • Exploration of permaculture in action in urban and rural contexts.

STUDENTS RECEIVE

  • A copy of the Introduction to Permaculture book by Bill Mollison,
  • Morning and afternoon tea/refreshments
  • Course notes, and
  • New friends and networks.

OUR TEACHING APPROACH

This is not a hands-on gardening course. This course is an engaging combination of theory and interactive group work. If you’re after a hands-on workshop have a look at what we have coming up here.

Two green thumbs up. Structure of the day, variety of delivery of information, engaging activities, amount of content covered, general warmth and enthusiasm all brilliant .

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YOUR TEACHER

Hannah Moloney is Good Life Permaculture’s lead landscape designer and educator. She grew up on a city farm in Brisbane growing herbs and has over 15 years of hands-on experience in designing, building and managing projects around urban agriculture, small-scale farming, permaculture and community development, including co-founding the Hobart City Farm. She has a post-grad diploma in community cultural development, a diploma in permaculture and since 2009, has been teaching permaculture across Australia. She’s had the pleasure of learning from Rosemary Morrow, Dr Elaine Ingham and David Holmgren. In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of teaching alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke. You can read more about Hannah here. 

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I think Hannah brought together senses of welcomeness and openness, whilst being informative and fun. Was really impressed.

VENUE

We’re holding this course at the Sustainable Learning Centre in Mt Nelson, Hobart. We’ll provide all details on how to get there for our students just before the course..

Such an interesting venue. Loads of drinks and delicious dip and cake!.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family..

I found it very inspiring, lovely to spend a weekend with like minded people while learning more about how to live sustainably while still enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

I enjoyed the way Hannah delivered the workshop and particularly the constant interaction/exercises that took place between our small groups. Total involvement. Also liked discovering the principles of Permaculture and the connectivity that comes with it. Was useful for our private plans.

Fantastic , in general I’m not a great learner in a classroom setup but I was engaged and interested throughout the whole day

Brilliant! I had such a great day and left feeling motivated to keep learning.

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Free Compost Workshop in March!

Learn how to compost your food waste at home for free!

In collaboration with the City of Hobart, we’re very happy to announce more free composting workshops for YOU to support you to compost your food waste at home and keep it out of landfill where it becomes a stinky, nasty pollutant.

SPACES ARE LIMITED – BOOK TODAY!

BECAUSE….. Did you know that food waste comprises nearly half of the rubbish in an average household rubbish bin and that up to (and over) 40% of landfills across Australia consist of pure food waste. Yuck!  Once in landfill, food waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition (because of the lack of oxygen) and generates methane. When released into the atmosphere, methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

So if you compost your food waste you’re diverting it from landfill and transforming it into nutrient-dense compost. Perfect for growing a great veggie patch in your own home or community garden!

THIS WORKSHOP WILL COVER HOW TO COMPOST FOOD WASTE WITH:

  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles,
  • Compost worm farms,
  • and more!

YOUR VENUE

This workshop is being held at Mathers House on a Sunday at the same time Farm Gate Market is happening directly out the front. Because of this you will be unable to drive directly to the front door. Instead, park in the Melville St carpark and walk across the road.

YOUR COMPOST TEACHER

Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold! You can read more about Hannah here. 

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Community Kraut-A-Thon With Sandor Katz!

You, me, your cabbages and SANDOR KATZ! That’s right Tasmania, we’re thrilled to be hosting Sandor Katz for this

Community Kraut-A-Thon!

What’s a Community Kraut-A-Thon?

Good question. It’s two hours of power where you hear Sandor talk about what ferments are, why you’d bother do them and answer all your “fermenty” questions. THEN, we all make sauerkraut together. To make this workshop as accessible (and fun) as possible, we’re asking everyone to bring their own ingredients and equipment – together we can make this kraut-a-thon awesome.

What to bring with you?

  • Cabbages (any varieties will work including green, savoy, red, Chinese and bok choy),
  • Salt,
  • Chopping board and knife,
  • Wide mouth glass jar/s with lids,
  • Large mixing bowl and spoon,
  • Any spices or herbs you fancy, i.e. chilli, dill, mustard seeds, oregano, peppercorns, garlic, ginger (etc), and
  • Maybe an apron – things tend to get messy.

About Sandor

Sandor Ellix Katz is a fermentation revivalist. Since 2003 when his book Wild Fermentation was published, Sandor has taught hundreds of workshops demystifying fermentation and empowering people to reclaim this important transformational process in their kitchens. The New York Times calls him “one of the unlikely rock stars of the American food scene.” Sandor’s latest book, The Art of Fermentation (2012), received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. The Southern Foodways Alliance honored him with their Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award. He’s presented workshops throughout the U.S., and across the whole world in every type of venue including universities, museums, libraries, farms, farmers’ markets, conferences, bookstores, festivals, and community spaces – and now in a small Hobart community hall!

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Venue

We’re holding this workshop at Mathers House on Bathurst St, Hobart. Please note, the weekly Farm Gate Market will be on so there’s no car access along Bathurst St that day.

Need some inspiration?

  • If you’re looking for some inspiration on the type of ferment we’ll be making on the day you can see older blogs on how we make sauerkraut and kim chi.
  • Check out Sandor Katz and his work here. 

*Enormous thanks to The Fermentary for bringing Sandor to Tasmania and sharing him with us. 

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How To Cook & Eat Globe Artichokes

Globe artichokes (Cynara scolymus)… They’re a strikingly beautiful plant to grow and, when starting out, strikingly confusing to eat. This little blog’s for all you folk wondering how to wrap your mouth around this thistle – without the thistle experience.

If you’re wondering how to grow them, you can read Peter Cundall here and Sustainable Gardening Australia over here. We’re just going to write about how to eat them.

Originating from the Mediterranean and central Asia these beauties are member of the thistle family – the edible part of the plant is the flower bud.

If you are growing them in your garden, then timing the harvest is critical to ensure you don’t end up with a mouthful of prickly thistles. You pick them when they’re quite young and undeveloped – this ensure their heart (the centre) is still soft. The image below shows a cluster of flower buds that are nice and young and good to eat.

Young artichokes ready to be picked. 

The image below shows a flower bud in my garden which is a bit too far gone – I won’t pick and eat this one as it will have already developed central prickles. Instead I’ll let it flower for the bees and for some eye candy.

A more mature artichoke which will have some prickly thistles inside.

By the way, the flowers are glorious and look something like this (not my garden, but from the internet with unknown source).

If you’re sourcing them from elsewhere than we can crack with how to eat them….

First, you need to take off the outer petals as these are quite tough – you’ll end up with a small flower bud in the middle as seen below.

Do this with all of your artichokes…

The easiest way to cook them is to pop them all in a large pot and add water.

Bring them to the boil and then simmer them until soft. They’ll look like this…

They’re now ready to eat. We make a dressing of olive oil, lemon juice, pepper and a nice vinegar and drizzle it over them or dip each one into a small bowl of dressing as you eat it. It’s delicious.

You’ll see below that once they’re cooked, you can easily pull them apart. On the left you have the heart and some of the stem (which is also delicious). On the right you have some petals – most of these are edible too – the tips will be a bit tough, just compost those.

We eat our artichokes with everything, last night I had scrambled eggs and artichokes for dinner – I’m a simple cook, Im sure you can do better!

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Real Skills For Growing Food

TWO DAYS OF HANDS-ON LEARNING, EQUIPPING YOU WITH THE SKILLS TO GROW FOOD IN YOUR OWN HOME.

We’re partnering with Fat Pig Farm to bring you two days of hands-on Real Skills for Growing Food. Join us to learn the foundations in growing your own food at home – skills that you’ll have for the rest of your life.

YOU’LL GET TO LEARN ALL ABOUT…

  • Soil: If you want to grow good food, you’re going to need to know about soil – this is the key to nutritious food production. We’ll introduce you to the soil food web and explore a range of soil preparation methods for different contexts.
  • Compost: Learn about a range of compost techniques and help build a big compost pile.
  • Propagation: Empower yourself to grow food from scratch – we’ll look at everything from making your own seed raising mix, planting seeds, and growing plants from cuttings.
  • Vegetable growing: We’ll introduce you to growing both annual and perennial vegetables so you can create diverse, edible gardens.

WHO SHOULD COME TO THIS WORKSHOP?

We’ve designed this workshop as an introduction for folks wanting to get started in growing their own food and for people looking for some extra guidance in refining their growing skills. If you’re looking for an advanced food growing workshop, this one isn’t for you – but stay tuned as we have big plans for a rather fantastic workshop on this.

STUDENTS RECEIVE

  • Full catering by Fat Pig Farm – it’s going to be delicious,
  • An invitation to an optional dinner on the Saturday night (additional cost applies),
  • Some solid time in Fat Pig Farm’s market garden where you’ll see strategies you can apply to your small or large garden,
  • A copy of The Practical Australian Gardener by Peter Cundall,
  • Seasonal vegetable seedlings to get you growing,
  • Extensive course notes on everything we cover over the weekend, and
  • Skills and knowledge useful for the rest of your life!

“The attention to detail was great – this makes everything run smoothly and comfortably. And the gifts were amazing! Not only did I have a wonderful weekend, I came away with so much stuff! Thank you”.

CATERING

Fat Pig Farm will spoil you with food to fill your belly, warm your hearts and inspire you to grow your own. Think hearty soups filled with fresh veggies from the garden, Fat Pig ham on bread straight from their wood fired oven, plus cakes and scones inspired by summer’s preserves.

SATURDAY NIGHT FARM FEAST

With Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans & Sadie Chrestman

All students plus their friends and family are invited to join us, Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans and Sadie Chrestman for a yarn and a cider over slow roasted farm grown goodness. Matthew and Sadie will fire up their wood fired oven and roast garden veggies and farm-grown meat. This is what we call a super special treat – not to be missed!

Please note, dinner is an optional extra to the daily workshops and costs an additional $80 per person. This is a wonderful chance to bring your family and friends along to soak up the hands-on learning vibes and enjoy the weekend with you.

*And yes, we can easily cater for people with different dietary needs.

Fat Pig Farm is nestled in Glaziers Bay, 10 minutes from Cygnet and is home to Sadie Chrestman and Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans. As a working farm, they run a market garden, mixed fruit and nut orchards, chickens, bees, some milking cows and raise pigs. They also have a delightful restaurant, open for weekly lunches and occasional cooking workshops.

HOW DO I GET THERE?

You’ll be provided with clear directions on how to get there prior to the course.

YOUR TEACHERS

Anton Vikstrom has well over a decade of hands-on experience in working with urban agriculture. His work includes establishing his homestead in South Hobart (which is shaping up to be an example of urban permaculture at its finest) and designing people’s properties. He is deeply committed to regenerating landscapes, building community, having a good life and supporting others to do the same.

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James DaCosta is head farmer at the Hobart City Farm. Originally from NW Tasmania, he was reared on the rich red soils of that region where he grew large and strong like a Kennebec (potato). He is a gardener, bee keeper, and permaculture designer. A natural teacher, James has a knack for inspiring and equipping people with the skills they need to get growing!

 

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Nadia Danti has been the head market gardener at Fat Pig Farm. She brings years of market gardening experience and has travelled the world working with some of the best growers out there to learn the skills she needed. Nadia is passionate about soil health and understanding the ecosystem under our feet, as well as supporting people to connect to their local food system and empowering them to grow some of their own food in whatever sized space they have!

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Firstly, thank you for a thoroughly enjoyable and educational course. As experienced growers, we were impressed that you covered so many areas so that inexperienced and experienced growers could walk away with something of value. It was a really positive feeling to walk away with a book, seedlings, trays, seeds, cuttings etc – was most generous and will be a great ongoing reminder of where we started (dead or not ;-)). Thank you so much everyone. You are great bunch!

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ACCOMMODATION

For folks travelling from afar – there are a wealth of local options for you to choose from, CLICK HERE to see a huge range of options put together by our friends at the Cygnet Folk Festival.

CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family – alternatively you’re welcome to put it towards one of our future courses.

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Four Goat Case Studies From Around Australia

We asked a few of our “goat friends” to answer some questions for us (and you) to provide more practical case studies for the world to learn from. Here you go!

Ecoburbia, Urban Fremantle, W.A

Shani and Tim

What key function/s do your goats serve on the property?

  • Our goats provide us with milk, cheese, and yogurt. They eat veggie scraps and garden refuge and also cuttings from neighbours and a local tree lopper who brings us stuff he knows they will like. Once they are finished we mulch the leftover branches and use them in the garden and compost
  • Our chickens are in the same pen as our goats and they like to scratch through the goat droppings for undigested grains. Their poo and spent oaten hay is a valuable addition to the compost.
  • Our goats are also much adored members of our household. We love them dearly. We sit and have a cup of tea in their pen every morning and that’s when they get their daily brush. They love trying to eat the tea leaves from the strainer.
  • They are also a great way to develop community.  Our sharewaste folk also bring treats for them – they will do anything for banana peels. They certainly get lots of visitors and people are free to wander into our backyard whenever they like. School finishing time is a popular time for visitors.
  • Our daily walks (down the middle of the road so no one is tempted by the roses) have meant we have met many people in our neighbourhood. There is usually someone keen to have a stroll with us and a chat as the goat’s graze. When Pumpkin was younger she used to play on the play equipment with the neighbourhood kids – she loves going up and sliding down the slide, and walking along the rope swing.
  • When we meet someone from Beaconsfield they often say “oh you’re the goat people” People seem proud of this quirky aspect in their neighbourhood.

How many goats do you have and what breed?

At the moment we have two goats – Whimsy (who is five) and Pumpkin (who is two). They are saanen goats. We mated Pumpkin recently with a 50% Nigerian dwarf and plan to mate Whimsy next year with a 100% Nigerian dwarf. Our goal is to breed a small goat who produces milk but is good for an urban environment.

What type of fencing do you have?

We have one metre high mesh fencing held in place with metal star pickets. They have only once jumped the fence – Pumpkin did accidentally when she got spooked by an umbrella. She was quite young and “frisky” She looked so shocked. People always comment that they will get out but they never have – I like to think they are happy in there.

Whimsy can however undo most gate latches so our gate has to be double locked with a carabiner. She can also undo bolts. Last year she went to the Royal Show, figured out how to undo her stall and then promptly undid all the other goat stalls – she loves a challenge. She watches everyone who leaves the pen and knows in an instance if the gate is not latched properly.

And once they are in the veggie garden . . . . .

How much space do they have in their paddocks/yard?

Our goat’s pen is about 70 square metres (not including their stables) They share this space with 12 chickens. They also have a space of about 30 square metres on the verge which is planted out with a fodder grass called paragrass and they graze there most days.

What do you feed them?

  • They get a grain mix of Lucerne chaff, goat pellets, barley and lupins twice a day at milking.
  • Also clean oaten hay daily (most of which they waste!) They get lots of veggie and garden scraps. When they go for a walk they always get some grazing time – weeks acacia, fennel – other interesting shrubs.
  • For a reward or a treat we feed them carob pods. We harvest and dry from a local tree every summer and that keeps us going all year.

How much time does it take to look after them per day/week?

  • Milking and feeding takes about half an hour morning and night. I don’t count our morning cuppa and brushing as care. The afternoon walk takes about an hour. So about 2 hours a day. Plus collecting feed, trimming hooves etc
  • When there are babies you tend to spend all day in there.
  • Although I walk the goats Tim and I share the milking duties and we like doing it together.
  • We have a few people in the community who can milk if we need them. Our most reliable is actually a 12 year old girl – the goats are better behaved for her than they are for us.

What type of preventative health approaches do you integrate into your animal management systems?

  • I would say my main preventative approaches would be daily observation – are they off their feed, what does their coat look like, were they a bit slow to eat their food, are they getting up when someone approaches with a treat? . . . . that sort of thing.
  • I don’t worm my goats unless they need it – I get a stool sample tested once every three months and they have never had worms
  • We are lucky because we are 15 minutes away from a university vet school that has a wonderful productive animal unit. They are also happy to do home visits for the cost of the travel. And they know our goats!

What’s been some of your key challenges in keeping goats?

We had goats “illegally” for many years but when we moved suburb we knew we would have to get permission. The council was well away we kept goats in our previous house but didn’t ever act as there were never complaints. Beg for forgiveness and all that!

When we moved here I enquired (anonymously) and was told there was no way. I approached the mayor who directed me to the head of health. The council had no policy so had to follow state legislation. Surprisingly, most of the conditions were easy to meet – 6 metres from the house, lots of sensible stable requirements . . . . . except for the fact they had to be 20 metres from any other house.

The head of health suggested if I could get support from all the houses within 20 metres  then they would look at my application. We wrote a letter outlining what their care etc would be like, and everyone signed.  . . . . . and we have the only legal goat stable in Freo. The cost has not been put up since 1982 ($27.50)  and they quite often forget to renew it.

I am proud of our council for their creative thinking in this regard. I think by proving it could be done (if illegally) it made things easier.

The main time things are tricky is when the goats are on heat – the constant crying is difficult. We have some soundproof walls we put up on their pen and they have to spend a couple of days inside. Our immediate neighbours are very tolerant.

We have had four complaints.

  1. One neighbour complained about the goats and us generally (“why don’t you f… off to the country”) provoked by one of our goats pooing on his lawn. Despite our attempts to talk to him he has written or phoned the council 16 times (they told us!) They came out to investigate the smell (one of his complaints) and I made them sniff the goat! I also letterboxed an apology note from the goats (for their poo!) to all the neighbours on our usual route. Tim asked other neighbours to write letters of support about the goats (the council has a process for complaint but not compliment) and we have not heard from them since. And luckily he has sold up and moved away (not because of us!)
  2. An ex farmer felt like our pen was too small. He complained to the mayor who suggested he contact the RSPCA which he never did. He has since moved away as well.
  3. The RSPCA came one day as someone had suggested our goat has mastitis. She had what is called a pendulous udder and it did look very swollen. She checked out the goat, had a cuddle and left. She was very annoyed as she had to drive two hours to investigate (their city based officers only deal with “city animals”
  4. Someone suggested to the council that we were selling milk. Someone reported us based on a facebook post and they came around to investigate. Of course we don’t sell milk . . . . . . We just got a letter saying “don’t sell milk” and all was good.

I get very stressed with there is something wrong with the goats – they are my babies!

Melliodora, Central Victoria (rural)

David Holmgren, Sue Dennet and Brenna Quinlan (who provided this text)

What key function/s do your goats serve on the property?

  • They debark fodder sticks, which we then put through the wood chipper, and use on pathways, in veggie bed pathways, in the deep littler chook run, and in our compost. This is a major source of carbon for our property, as we don’t tend to buy in straw or other external inputs.
  • They are also our pets, so they give us love and cuddles. They get us out down the gully where we tether them each day so they can eat blackberry, so we get daily engagement with our commons, and Su gets daily exercise and ‘goatie time’, which is important when you’re in your 70s.
  • They reduce fire hazard by eating blackberry. This is very important in Central Victoria, the most fire prone region in the world. In spring when the grass is high we fence off paddocks on neighbouring properties and have them eat and trample the grass to reduce the need for slashing.
  • They give us milk each morning. We have 3 milking girls, Pip, Willow and Chia. Because none of them have had babies in two years (and three for pip), we only get about 3 litres of milk total, and now that Chia has one teat out of action, we’re only getting 2 litres. We make cheese, yogurt and use the whey for bread making and pickles.
  • They give us manure for compost.
  • We only mate them every 3 years, so when they have baby boy goats, we get meat from them as well.

  An illustration depicting the role goats play at Melliodora, by Brenna Quinlan

How many goats do you have and what breed?

We have three goats, which are all mixed breeds. Pip looks like a Toggenburg, and Willow is part Saanen, although she is fatter and has much shorter legs. Chia is Willow’s daughter. Willow and Pip were reject goats from Holy Goat, our local organic goat dairy.

What type of fencing do you have?

Our one hectare property is fenced against rabbits and foxes, and we divide it up with electronet into paddocks, depending on the season and the rotation with chooks and geese. We don’t ever let the goaties into the orchard because they ringbark the trees, and the one paddock containing fruit trees has electrified fencing around the trees to avoid ringbarking. Each day we take the goats out to the gully and tether them, or to a fenced off neighbour’s paddock to eat, and we bring them in with fodder each evening.

How much space do they have in their paddocks/yard?

From a whole paddock (quarter acre), to the length of their tether, which is about 4 metres. When they are in their stall at night they sometimes have about 10m squared, but sometimes we open the adjacent paddock and then they have about an eighth of an acre and the dam to wander around at night time.

What do you feed them?

At breakfast time they get the equivalent of a one litre jug each of a mix of lucern chaff and a small amount of seconds grain from a local organic supplier. They also get a slosh of vinegar and a handful of kelp seaweed to cut down on methane. Every second day they’ll get a half teaspoon of minerals too – a mix of sulphur, copper and dolomitic lime (so a teaspoon. so 1/2 a teaspoon of sulphur, 1/2 of dolomitic lime and the tiniest pinch of copper, divided between them). During the day they’ll demolish a blackberry patch, and a lot of other grasses, shrubs and wild plum trees that they’re tied up next to.

In the evening we’ll bring them a large bundle of willow or oak (summer), and blackwood or tagasaste (winter) or whatever needs pruning. The amount is equivalent to a small tree – almost to my limit of what I can drag up the hill.

How much time does it take to look after them per day/week?

About an hour to an hour and a half each morning, because taking them out is very time consuming, depending on how far away the blackberry is. Then in the evening about half an hour to cut fodder and bring them in. We share the duties – I do three days a week of animal care, which included feeding chooks and collecting the eggs, and I keep the milk on those three days. Su and Dave share duties and milk/eggs for the other four days.

What type of preventative health approaches do you integrate into your animal management systems?

We clip their nails every month or so. Their stall has a slotted floor so it’s relatively clean. We have dry spaces for them to be to avoid hoof rot. Su checks their condition to see if they need worming. We feed them a lot of diverse stuff during the day so they are healthy.

What’s been some of your key challenges in keeping goats?

  • Taking them out in the morning is a challenge, because they tend to run off in the wrong direction, and they are very stubborn. It’s much easier and less frustrating with two people, and I quite enjoy taking them out with Su and spending that time with her.
  • It’s also become more and more difficult for Dave to kill the baby goats as the years go on. Two years ago Pip adopted a boy goat from another farm when he was 2 days old, and even that was really sad when he was 6 months old and had to die. The goats grieve for their babies.
  • Our goats also retire here, so when I arrived we had Bet, who hadn’t been milked in 8 years, and was always getting her horns stuck in the fence and falling over. She died two years ago, and looking after her was very time consuming.
  • Chia had a wound on her udder and it has healed closed, so for the past two weeks we’ve been gently piercing the opening again, but it is slow and I would like to dry her off.

  

The above photo is of the blackberry slope that the goats cleared this winter. We had them there for a couple weeks, moving them a bit further each day. The canes will break down and now trees can be planted there.

Good Life Permaculture, urban Hobart

Hannah, Anton and Frida

What key function/s do your goats serve on the property?

  • Our goats provide milk daily which we turn into cheeses and yoghurt (plus fresh milk of course).
  • They help manage the weeds on our property and in the nearby state forest. We inherited certain ornamental weeds which we use as a windbreak and cut fresh fodder from them daily. We also cut and bring home weeds from the nearby state forest. The weeds we have that we feed them include Tagasaste, Catoneaster, Photinia and Mirror bush. We also grow some Acacia for them, but it’s their least favourite!

How many goats do you have and what breed?

We have toggenburg goats. While we normally have two female adults, we momentarily have four in our space, two females and twin boy goats who are still very young. Once naturally weaned, these boys will move to farms as we don’t have the space to keep them here.

What type of fencing do you have?

We have a hardwood timber post and rail and mesh fencing. Goats love to use fences (non-electric) to rub up against, so these timber frameworks are nice and strong and provide their scratch post. They’re around 1.5m high.

How much space do they have in their paddocks/yard?

Our goat’s yard is approximately 80m2 which includes their shed. We also tether them on our grass patches sporadically – but only when we can supervise them.

What do you feed them?

We buy in a mixed chaff (oat and lucern blend) and steamed/rolled barley grain. We feed them 2 litres of chaff (approx. 800g) and 600g of barley twice a day (morning and evening) for each milking goat and half that for each doe that’s not lactating. I’ll also cut fresh fodder daily for them and occasionally they get tethered on grass (when we’re home and can supervise).

How much time does it take to look after them per day/week?

I spend around 1 hour with them daily with them. This includes morning milking, feeding and cutting of fodder and then an evening feed. We only milk one goat in the morning.

What type of preventative health approaches do you integrate into your animal management systems?

  • Our goats came from a wonderful farm, but also came with a level of worms. My understanding is that you can never really get rid of the worm population once you have them. So we manage them.
  • We make sure they have diverse diet of fresh fodder.
  • A mineral block which they can help themselves to any time – we have “Mineral Health Essentials + Copper” from Olsson’s (that’s the brand name).
  • We cut their toenails every 6 – 8 weeks to keep their feet healthy.
  • We’re still trying to find the right worming treatment that they’ll actually eat properly. I think our goats are a bit spoiled so they often reject the herbs we mix in with their feed. They’ll literally not eat their food (or not much of it) if they think “it’s not quite right”. So we’re still experimenting with the best system for them and have tried a wide range of things. This has included conventional drenching with a product call Panacur which has a one day withholding period from drinking milk. Apparently this isn’t strong enough for most commercial herds with worms as they build up a tolerance to it quickly. We’ve used it twice in 2 years and it appears to have helped manage the situation. However we’re also still trying to train them to eat the herbs.

What’s been some of your key challenges in keeping goats?

  • Finding experts to advise on natural preventative worming approaches which work well.
  • When they’re in heat (every autumn), they can get very noisy every 3 weeks for a few days at a time. One season the youngest goat also developed advanced jumping skills and they both jumped the fence. They only did this once.
  • Finding friends who can milk and look after them while we’re away. It’s not for everyone and we generally struggle to find someone who can “do it all”. Luckily we’re happy homebodies so don’t travel too much.

You can find a bit more detail about our set up on an older goat blog from 2017 here. 

Sue Dennet milks Gerty at Good Life Permaculture while Frida shows off her chook catching skills

Twelve Trees Farm, Cygnet (rural)

Jilly Middleton (Jilly no longer keeps goats on her property, the below is from past experience)

 What key function/s do your goats serve on the property?

We had between 15-40 goats over 7 years primarily to manage gorse, blackberries and thistles. We milked some and ate goat meat. We sold live goats to eat other peoples weeds as well. we also cuddled many, many goat kids.

How many goats do you have and what breed?

We started with 15, dropped down to 9 within the first year to strengthen the herd. we didn’t breed every year, we bought some in and sold some. We had some who were worry warts and were sold to backyards where they got lots of attention. We had some who were predisposed to getting their heads stuck in ringlock, they were sold or eaten. We had some that always had triplets and would struggle to thrive. We bred for hardiness, specifically for parasite resistance, and foot health.

What type of fencing do you have?

External fences are 90cm high mesh (sheep or wallaby ringlock) with a single or double strand of electric up top, and an electric single line on an outrigger about a foot off the ground. Internal fences are many and varied. We used gallagher ‘smart fences’ which had 5 strands of electric poly wire with tread ins, and made our own temporary electric fences with steel rods and insulators to graze strategically within paddocks.

How much space do they have in their paddocks/yard?

Too much, usually! The fenced part of the property was about 80 acres. one of our challenges was maintaining a large enough herd/small enough paddocks to have significant impact on the woody weeds.

What do you feed them?

Hay – the amount depended on the length of the winter, and whether the goats were bred. We also fed them propharma mineral lick, and a monthly week of worming herbs. This varied depending on what was available on the farm and in the shops- oregano oil (3 drops/day/goat, fresh garlic, nigella seeds, pine/wormwood branches, rosemary, apple cider vinegar, kelp were long standing favourites) we’d use kelp meal and lucerne chaff to mix with supplements.

How much time does it take to look after them per day/week?

Anything from 30 minutes a week to 4 hours a day in kidding season.  For about 5 months we’d supplement their diet with hay, some weeks we’d let them into a bush paddock and pop back once a week to check them all out. we trimmed their feet every 3 months or as needed. Once, we needed to do it every 2 months and that was because we were overfeeding minerals in the Pat Coleby style.

What type of preventative health approaches do you integrate into your animal management systems?

  • Eventually we bought the best stock we could afford, bred for resilience, destocked in bad years, made sure they had adequate nutrition and didn’t push them too hard. We’d take a year off kidding if we thought they were slow to recover/we knew we would be busy with a new baby (of the human type for us)!
  • Rotational grazing for parasite management and many experiments with mineral supplementation. We started with the Pat Coleby regime; using dolomite, copper, sulfur. That was a good starting place – copper can help control internal parasites, dolomite makes the copper safer for the goat, sulfur helps to control the externals. However its a blunt tool and misses some marks. We had some goats present with possible whilte muscle disease one year and we started using the propharma supp to efficiently get a nice mix of minerals in. If it were just a few goats, I’d be more excited about finding the organic mineral sources to feed the goats.
  • Herbal worm treatment took many forms depending on ingredient availability. We would tend to use it every few weeks for a week, and at specific strategic times. After kidding for the mums, at weaning time for the kids, the first warm wet days of spring. Keeping housing clean and treated with lime after wet seasons and/or suspicion of worms.
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The Goat Workshop

A workshop for people wanting to keep goats holistically, productively and consciously.

Join Jilly Middleton and Hannah Moloney at Fat Pig Farm to learn about keeping goats naturally. Based on their lived experience, this workshop will provide tips, tricks and depth of information you simply can’t find in the books, or on goat forums (trust me, we’ve tried).

This workshop will cover

  • Keeping goats to manage farm weeds, i.e. blackberries and gorse,

  • Raising goats to be hardy and low maintenance,
  • Domestic goat keeping: Keeping goats in urban or small areas,
  • Wholistic goat care,
  • What to feed your goats,
  • Breeding goats,
  • Fencing, and
  • So much more!

Participants receive

  • Theoretical information and discussion on everything goats,
  • Tour of goats in action on the farm,
  • Delicious and nutritious lunch from Fat Pig Farm,
  • Course notes, tailored for the Tasmanian context, and
  • New networks and goat friends to connect with into the future.

Teaching team

Jilly Middleton runs Twelve Trees Farm in Cygnet – an organic blueberry farm. While she currently has no goats on her farm, she spent 7 years farming goats naturally for meat, milk and to manage a range of weeds on her farm include gorse and blackberries. She is a wealth of practical knowledge and has a rare depth of information on everything goat.

She recently sold her goat herd to Fat Pig Farm where they now spend their days eating blackberries. You can see her talking goats with Matthew Evans talking  on a recent episode of The Gourmet Farmer here.

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Hannah Moloney runs Good Life Permaculture where she’s the lead educator and permaculture designer. For the past two years, she’s also been doting on two toggenburg goats – one of which she milks daily in central Hobart. She brings the unique experience of urban goat keeping, has worked through numerous challenges of sourcing food, health and fencing. All of this can be applied to any domestic “house goat context” in both rural and (some) urban locations.

 

Food

This workshop includes delicious and nutritious lunch from the Fat Pig Farm kitchen. You’ll feast on seasonal produce straight from their farm. We can’t really describe how good their food is (it’s really good), so you’ll just have to come try it.

Venue

We’re holding this workshop at Fat Pig Farm in Glaziers Bay. Fat Pig Farm have their own herd of goats which students get to see in action. Bred by Jilly around the corner on her own farm, these goats have been trained to eat weeds, specifically gorse and blackberries.

Where’s Fat Pig Farm? The exact location of the venue will be shared with students closer to the workshop.

Cancellation policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

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Introduction to Small-Scale Beekeeping

A one day introduction to small-scale beekeeping course designed for the beginner and novice beekeeper keen to have one (or a few) hives in their homes. We’ll guide you through the key foundations of bee theory and action so that by the end of the day you’ll be either ready to start on your bee journey, add to it or refine it.

THIS WORKSHOP HAS SOLD OUT, HOWEVER WE MADE ANOTHER ONE FOR YOU WHICH YOU CAN BOOK INTO HERE. 

THIS WORKSHOP WILL

  • Provide the theory you need to get started in beekeeping
  • Discuss the importance of bees in our food systems, key threats to their health and how you can help them out
  • Show you three different types of hives – the langstrothwarre and top bar beehive and how they work so you can make an informed decision for your own place
  • Open a live hive so you can see how to manage and work with bees on a practical level
  • Introduce you to some of the simple and best tools to utilise as a beginner beekeeper

STUDENTS RECEIVE

  • A bee veil,
  • Morning and afternoon tea and treats (we invite people to bring a plate of food to share for lunch),
  • A whole bunch of new bee friends and networks to stay in contact with, and
  • Course notes, jam packed with information to support you to be a gun beekeeper!

YOUR TEACHERS


Anton Vikstrom
is a sustainability specialist with over 15 years experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development, energy efficiency and sustainability. In recent years, honey bees have crept into his list of passions and he currently keeps top bar hives and is looking to expand in numbers and types. Anton is one of those rare breeds with both deep theoretical knowledge and practical capabilities. Over the years, this has seen him work for the Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Sustainable Living Tasmania. At the same time he has finally honed his practical skills in everything from off-grid solar power, carpentry, landscaping, brewing beers and wines, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

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img_6834James Da Costa
 grew up on the NW coast of Tasmania and currently lives in lovely Hobart town. He has been keeping bees on a backyard scale for the past 6 years and throughout this time has been collecting and re-homing swarms and wild colonies of honey bees. He currently manages around 6 hives in suburban settings, is a founding member of the Hobart City Farm and has a background in permaculture design, community engagement and small-scale food systems. Over the past two years he has been building and sampling the workings of a few different hive designs and is interested in the effects of these designs on bee health, behaviour and how their unique designs and construction methods lend themselves to people’s diverse situations.

VENUE

We’re hosting this one day extravaganza in New Town at the Hobart City Farm and Kickstart Arts (across the road from the City Farm). We’ll provide additional details on how to get there closer to the course date.

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CANCELLATION POLICY

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

* Feeling keen? You can read more about different types of beehives here.

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Permaculture Teacher Training

Join us for six days of intensive training that will provide you with a game-changing toolkit to use in the classroom and life in general.  Whether you’re already a teacher, or thinking of becoming one, this course is designed to turn teaching into a transformative and fun exchange. Classrooms will never be the same again.

You’ll walk away from this course being able to communicate clearly and confidently with a group of people.  Plus you’ll join a learning community of teachers full of inspiration, mutual support and on-going learning.

Course requirement

We require all students to have completed a Permaculture Design Course (PDC) (anywhere in the world) before the course starting date. Please contact us if you have any questions regarding this.

This course is for PDC holders in any of the following fields…

If you’re looking to do any type of sustainability or permaculture education/communication, this is the course you’ve been waiting for. This includes teachers and students of architecture, landscape design, school/community gardeners, local government community development officers, ecology and other disciplines including geography, regenerative agriculture and agroforestry as well as permaculture design.

You will learn how to…

  • Design a short, or long course
  • Develop clear course outcomes and ethics
  • Adopt appropriate body behaviour and use nonviolent communication
  • Design effective learning resources
  • Use teaching aids effectively
  • Work with a broad range of people from different cultures and backgrounds
  • Draw on strategies that promote thinking and integrate practical experience
  • Deliver clear explanations and concepts
  • Explain the structure and function of the Permaculture Design Course
  • Give effective and engaging lectures with powerpoint
  • Debrief and give appraisal of your own, and other teaching techniques

Your teachers

Hannah Moloney is a full time permaculture designer  and educator who works with land holders to design landscapes that beautiful, abundant and resilient. When not designing, she’s running community projects, gardening and being a guest presenter on Gardening Australia (in the first half of 2019).

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David HolmgrenRosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke. In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm and in 2018 she took part in the Tasmanian Leaders Program. You can read more about Hannah here.

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Brenna Quinlan is a permaculture educator and illustrator. She regularly teaches PDCs with Melliodora (with David Holmgren) and Milkwood and is a regular guest teacher on Retrosuburbia Train the Trainers course and in the past, a series of Rucache permaculture courses in Argentina and Brazil. In 2018 Brenna co-taught the Permaculture Teacher Training course and a CERES Train the Trainers course with Rosemary Morrow, and is currently working with permaculture band Formidable Vegetable Sound System and Resource Smart Schools Victoria in bringing permaculture education to schools. As an illustrator, Brenna’s work can be seen in David Holmgren’s 2018 book Retrosuburbia, as well as the Milkwood Book, Farming Democracy, and Delvin Solkinson’s permaculture educational resources.

Students receive

  • Catering – delicious and nutritious vegetarian food for the duration of the course.
  • A copy of Earth User’s Guide to Teaching Permaculture: An invaluable friend to the experienced and novice teacher alike.
  • Class notes and resources.
  • A whole new network of teachers and doers for you to draw on, and be part of!

Venue & class schedule

This course is being held at the Sustainable Learning Centre, a 10 minute drive from Hobart city. Please note, there is no onsite accommodation.

This course runs from 8:30 – 5pm each day.

Cancellation policy

If you need to withdraw from this course we ask that you give us 2 weeks notice, we’ll provide a refund minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you’re welcome to pass your place onto a friend or family member or put the full fee towards one of our future courses.

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