Order my book ‘The Good Life: How To Grow A Better World’ here!

The Hot Box

When it comes to energy efficient hacks, the humble hot box is as simple as it gets.

The hot box is exactly what it sounds like, and is how you can cook quite a lot of your food after being initially heated on the stove for a short time. But why bother?

Australian households are responsible for around 20% of our country’s greenhouse gas emissions – quite significant. And while we desperately need big industry and government to lead the way in slashing emissions, we can still do our bit in our own context as well. Including in your kitchen.

Source – Your Home

To get hot boxing, bring your dish of choice to the boil – this could be rice, veggie stew, anything. Once it’s boiled, turn off the heat and place it in an insulated box where it will continue to cook in its own heat. You can then walk away and go about your own business until you’re ready to eat! I love this method as (a) you’ll never burn rice again and (b) it saves you time and (c) reduces the amount of energy you use. So many wins!

You can see a basic diagram I’ve drawn (from my book) on how it works below and can also watch the full process over here on your Good Life For All youtube series. Enjoy!

 

Leave a comment

Pink Pickled Eggs – Video

Back in 2014 I did a blog on how to make pink pickled eggs (so long ago!), and have recently made a little video to go with it to show the full process.

Learning how to preserve your harvest from your garden and chooks) is a key skill that will help extend your season and eliminate any waste. Making pink pickled eggs is also quite fun.

This is the 16th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

Leave a comment

6 Hacks For Easy Chook Keeping

If you’re looking to start keeping chickens, or are wanting to tweak and refine your current system, this video is for you.

I’ve summarised just six hacks which will transform you and your chicken’s lives and included some more links to other highly useful things you can do in the resources list at the end of this blog.

This is the 14th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

More chicken resources

Leave a comment

Managing Your Perennial Kale “Trees”

This week I’ve put together a little follow up video on the “Perennial Kale Trees” video I did around a month ago.  I explain how you manage the plants once they go to seed or get invaded by aphids – which happens to us all!

This little video shows you a simple way you can navigate it all and keep the plant going for a good few years. Enjoy!

This is the 13th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

More resources

Leave a comment

Edible Flowers

You may not realise that so many of the flowers in your garden can actually feature in your next meal.  In this latest Good Life For All video I take you for a stroll through our garden where I harvest and eat seven different flowers.

This is the 12th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

Leave a comment

Food Forests

Come for a tour of a few of our small food forests to learn what they are, the plants we’ve included and how they play a key role in our steep landscape.

This is the 11th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

How can food forests help build climate resilience?

Two key ways are…

  1. Food forests are perennial plant systems. Perennial landscapes have minimal disturbance to the soil and have abundant soil cover with a diverse range of plants. Overall, perennial landscapes are more stable and on a large scale can help store significant amounts of carbon in the ground. Great for countering the climate emergency.
  2. When it comes to food production, once established perennial food systems like food forests can produce more crops with less inputs for longer amounts of time. This is highly useful to build resilience into our food production patterns.

More resources

Leave a comment

How To Make Yoghurt (video)

Making your own yoghurt doesn’t have to involve buying new machines/gear. It just involves your existing pots and pans, time and some mature yoghurt to get the party started!

The latest video in our Good Life For All series shows you exactly how – I love making these little videos as a way to support people to build home and community resilience – especially in the face of the climate emergency.

How does making yoghurt build climate resilience?

  • In times of disruption (i.e. covid, climate change), food outlets have approximately only 4 – 7 days of food stocked on their shelves. When we learn more skills around how to make some of our own food, we become less dependent on shops to provide it to us.
  • Making your own yoghurt can help prevent food waste. You can make yoghurt from slightly sour milk which you’d normally avoid eating. The more we eliminate food waste the better… In Australia alone, around 40% of landfill is pure food waste. Once there, it’s buried and compacted with mixed waste where it becomes anaerobic and produces methane gases. A toxic gas which is up to 25 x more harmful than Carbon dioxide (CO2).
  • Making yoghurt can contribute with resource resilience, i.e saving some $$$ and reduce the amount of plastic being used in your home.

You can watch all about it below and also read an older blog I wrote about it here.

BUT FIRST: I made a significant typo in the vid captions. When I talk about heating the milk, it should say 80 degrees Celsius (not Fahrenheit). Sorry! I blame it on late night editing!

This is the 10th video in our Good Life For All series. Each Monday I’ll pop up a video to help inspire folks in building climate resilience for their homes and communities.

Leave a comment