Posts tagged ‘permaculture tasmania’

Permaculture Design Course

19 January – 2 February, 2018, Dodges Ferry, Southern Tasmania

Join us for two weeks of deep permaculture design learning. You’ll leave this course knowing how to design resilient, robust landscapes & people-scapes in a  beautiful learning environment.

This Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) has been structured so you get to design your own property of choice, plus complete a permaculture design for a real life client and property. This provides you the opportunity to test and practice permaculture designing in a range of contexts with the support of experienced designers and practitioners right at your side to step you through it all.

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

.

I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita).

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…
Louden-Version2-724x1024

  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus more. View the full course schedule here. 

.

.

Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha).

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

3

What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

As part of your course fee you receive…

DSC07590-1024x681

  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • Course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Pip Permaculture Magazine
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

.

The Teaching Team

Stay tuned for our full teaching team to be announced in the coming months. 

IMG_5913 2

YOUR LEAD TEACHER: Hannah Moloney is a professional permaculture designer who has been working with urban/rural property owners since 2012 to create productive, beautiful landscapes. With a strong background in community cultural development she’s been working on community projects that create positive change since 2001 and teaching permaculture since 2009 across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute (since closed), Milkwood Permaculture and at home in Tasmania with Good Life Permaculture.

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke (US author of Edible Forest Gardens). In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

Nick Towle is a passionate advocate for sustainability and permaculture and brings a diverse set of skills to the course including home-based sustainability practices and community economic systems. His most recent permaculture adventure has involved establishing the RESEED Trust, a two acre urban property in the heart of Penguin (NW Tasmania) which is being developed into a permaculture demonstration site and sustainability education centre.

.

Anton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist with deep experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development and energy efficiency.  He’s had the pleasure to work with The Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and currently works with Sustainable Living Tasmania (in energy efficiency projects) and Good Life Permaculture (as designer and teacher).  His intellect is backed up with practical sustainability skills – from off-grid solar power, small-scale beekeeping, carpentry, landscaping to brewing beer, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

We also take our students on field trips to see and meet other fantastic sites and people. 

.

.

Thanks for being awesome! Thanks also for the shared life-experiences/knowledge of the teachers. One thing that really stood-out for me was the “people care” of the students, and everyone really, throughout the two weeks. I have never before experienced this in the many workshops, courses and places of learning/study that I have attended. My wish is that such a thing becomes the “normal” way of being – YEAH!

Venue

We’re holding this course at the vibrant Okines Community House and garden in Dodges Ferry, southern Tasmania. This active community hub features a food co-op, beautiful community garden, a pizza oven and is located near a local surf beach – it’s a rocking place!

2

Accommodation

We provide free camping (BYO all your own gear) onsite with access to toilets, showers and inside spaces to relax in.

If you’d prefer to not camp, there are also local places you can stay independently, have a look at a large selection herehere and here. 

Good-life

One Full PDC Scholarship on Offer!

In the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to a lucky someone. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

To apply CLICK HERE. 

Catering

We provide nutritious and delicious vegetarian food for the entire course and can cater for a large range of dietary needs with wholesome, locally sourced and organic food where possible.

Untitled design (1)

 

How to get to the PDC

Dodges Ferry is approximately 45 minutes from Hobart and 30 minutes from the Hobart airport.

  • By Boat: If you’re coming from Melbourne, Victoria – you can catch the boat (a 12 hour journey) from Port Melbourne to Devonport. From Devonport it is a 4 hour drive to Dodges Ferry.  To see the timetable and book your ticket visit the Spirit of Tasmania
  • By car: If you’re driving to the course and have a spare seat you’re willing to offer to another student, please get in touch so we can help connect you. It’s also well worth checking out Cool Pool Tas, Tasmania’s very own car pooling network! There is easy bike and car parking at the venue in an off street car park.
  • By bus: There are regular buses traveling from Hobart to Dodges Ferry, check out the timetable here.
  • By plane: The closest airports to Dodges Ferry is the Hobart airport. Check out the webjet website to find the most affordable deal. To get to Dodges Ferry from the airport your options are to hire a car, or talk to us about organising a carpooling arrangement with a fellow student or a possible bulk pick up.

2

Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full be the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can talk details.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

Leave a comment

Fermentation Fest

Want to learn how to make simple, nutritious and delicious ferments in your own home?

We’ve designed this practical, hands-on learning experience just for you, showing you how to make:

  • Tempeh (soybeans inoculated and fermented with rhizopus spores),
  • Sauerkraut and kim chi (both wild ferments based on salt and cabbage),
  • Pickles (with vegetables),
  • Country wine (using seasonal fruits),
  • Sourdough bread, and
  • Yoghurt.

Skills that will be useful for the rest of your days! We’ll also feed you a delicious and nutritious lunch featuring all things fermented from locally sourced, chemical-free and homegrown produce.

3

Students receive

  • A jar of sauerkraut which you’ll make on the day,
  • A tempeh kit (tempeh spores, soybeans and instructions) so you can make your own at home,
  • A sourdough starter,
  • A scrumptious lunch where we’ll feed you with as many fermented things we can make, and
  • Extensive notes on how to start or keep fermenting food for the rest of your life.

Teaching Team

IMG_6691Over the past 12 years, Anton Vikstrom has dappled, explored and has now completely integrated ferments into his daily life.  There is always something bubbling on his kitchen bench or in the pantry and always unique and scrumptious smells wafting through the air.  He especially enjoys teaching the fermentation process as it should be, simply.  He breaks the processes down into easy steps so that anyone, yes anyone, can get fermenting – anywhere, any time. That’s him in the photo with a bunch of homegrown hops used to make homebrew! You can read more about him here.

 

.

 

margaret-284x300Margaret Steadman is a local sustainability maven and makes a wicked sourdough loaf. Specialising in ‘keeping it simple’, she’ll step you through the basics of how to make amazingly delicious sourdough, share some of her starter with you and feed you with her bread as part of lunch. Her deep and passion for living life simply and well is so contagious that’ll you’re all going to fall in love her, just a bit! ,

.

.

Venue & Times

This course is being held at the very wonderful Sustainable Learning Centre at 50 Olinda Grove, Mt Nelson and runs from 10am – 4pm.

2

Sourdough starters being shared around and some rather delicious fresh tempeh!

Fermentation Resources

Look no further than Sandor Katz and his Wild Fermentation website – enjoy!

Cancellation Policy

There are no refunds available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

Leave a comment

Home Brew Beer & Cheer

A day for the beginner and intermediate brewer where you get to see, do, talk and taste everything home brew. You’ll leave this day knowing how to brew your own beer and cheer from scratch – setting you up for a life of happiness (and significant savings).

Ready to book in? Just scroll down to the bottom of this page and go for it!

You’ll get to…

  • Hear about and see different approaches to brewing, 11
  • Do a partial mash,
  • Do a complete full mash beer,
  • Bottle beer,
  • Discuss the process as we do the brewing, rather than lots of talk and chalk, and
  • Sample some brews through the day – in a safe and responsible kind of way.

Who should come to this workshop?

We’ve designed this workshop for the beginner and intermediate brewer. So if you’ve never brewed a beer in your life or just looking for some extra information and inspiration this is the perfect day for you.

Students receive…

  • The Sustainable Home Brewing book by Amelia Slayton Loftus – a really, really good book we think you need.Sustainable_Homebrewing_large
  • Course refreshments: We’ll provide a tasty morning and afternoon tea (and hot drinks). Lunch is BYO – we invite participants to bring a plate of food to share with the group. This is a whole lot more fun and sociable than just bringing your own sandwich.
  • Sample sips of home brew throughout the day and a beer at the end to say “cheers”. Please note as people will be driving, all drinking will be kept to a safe and responsible level.
  •  Enthusiastic teaching, networks and company for the day (and most likely beyond).

 

Your brewing guides

FullSizeRender (5)Tim Bowden: For almost a decade Tim lived in the United States enjoying the delicious beers and explosion of the craft beer scene. He realised that he probably couldn’t get those flavours back home in Tasmania, so thought he’d better learn how to brew them himself. Tim dove in head first to All Grain brewing and talked to brewers, watched videos, took short university brewing courses and even did an internship at a craft brewery. He then built himself a simple little home brew system and have been churning through batches and experimenting ever since.  Tim’s *so* good that he won both the brewers choice and peoples choice awards in the 2014 Tasmanian Battle of the Brews. His current brewing projects are in the dark art of ageing sour beers.

.

.

img_6691Anton Vikstrom: After many, many years of brewing Anton recently started growing his own hops and actually following recipes. As a result, his beer has graduated to a new and wonderful level where even his wife (who doesn’t drink beer) has started having the occasional bottle as it’s just so darn tasty. Bringing a “can-do and keep-it-simple” approach to brewing, Anton is a star at using what you’ve got to create fabulous beers (no kitchen utensils are safe any more).

.

.

Venue & course times

This course runs from 10am – 4pm at the Sustainable Learning Centre, 50 Olinda Grove, Mt Nelson.

Feeling keen?

If you want to learn how to brew from scratch *right now* or just get inspired, have a read of our blog here showing you how.

Cancelation policy

There are no refunds available for this course. If you can’t make the day we encourage you to pass your place onto a friend or family member – which shouldn’t be too hard as it’s a home brew workshop!

Leave a comment

Our Permaculture Design Course: A Student’s Insight!

Every permaculture design course (PDC) we run we always offer at least one full scholarship to make sure we support people who need it most to access this training. On our last PDC Permaculture Tasmania also sponsored someone to come along – how fantastic! Meet Shane and read about his experience below.

Shane working hard on his group design project and fellow student, Ryan working in the community garden we hold this course in. 

“I recently completed a PDC with Good Life Permaculture at Okines Community Garden/Centre at Dodges Ferry just out of Hobart. It was a great educational and totally engaging experience which brought together excellent teachers in their fields, and a group hungry to absorb all that was given to them. The course brought together people from a range of countries and diverse backgrounds who left with many new friends and a direction to move in. The venue too was a great choice, showcasing how the local community can be brought together with great initiatives which seek to be inclusive of all.

I had previously completed a PDC with Bill Mollison and Janet Millington back in 2002 and then a family came along and a mortgage and I sort of lost my way a bit. I had always kept in touch with what was going on, and I have used this course as a chance to get back on the horse and gain some new inspiration and direction.

.

I believe this course also helped me with my own confidence, being able to say what one thought without being judged on personal values was a great feeling in itself.

.

I had always thought I’d had a pretty sound knowledge of permaculture systems, this course however with its fabulous teaching staff helped to flesh it out even more for me and hammered home the point that permaculture “is not just about gardening”. That being said it was awesome to go check out and learn from some great permie ‘gardeners’ on the field trip. The importance of applying the ethics and principles as much as possible without being a ‘permacultist’ was also duly noted, no-one is perfect but it’s worth giving it a good crack. Something really important I had forgotten was to start from zone 0/1 and work outwards, it would have made my life a whole lot easier!

Now I’m back in “real life’ and looking for a change. I’m helping out at a new community garden we’re are about to start in St Helens (NE Tas), the fence is up and we’re getting into a bit of planning using the knowledge I gained from the course.  We will be taking on a work for the dole program there and aiming to provide education, training and health driven outcomes for members of the community, and pass on the permie bug! Hopefully I can encourage more members of my local community to think more deeply about the impacts we all can have and make them positive ones!

.

Finally, I fully encourage anyone who is wondering about their place in the world to look into permaculture, be inspired, take a course and pass on the knowledge you gain. If your teachers are half as good as these guys you’ll still find it a positive life changing experience.

.
Thank you very much Permaculture Tasmania, and extra big thanks to Hannah Moloney, Anton Vikstrom, Nick Ritar, Jonathon Cooper, Oberon Carter and Millie Rooney. Not forgetting the kitchen crew Lou, Maddie and Kathy and of course Mr Resourceful, that’s you Blake!”

Thank you Shane! Thanks for coming, for investing your time and energy into working out the nuts and bolts for how you can make your own positive impact in your own and your community’s world. Onwards and upwards!

Interested in doing your own permaculture design course?

Join us this Jan 19 – Feb 2 in southern Tasmania for a life changing and affirming learning experience!

Leave a comment

Introduction to Permaculture

Join us for one day of exploration into permaculture. You’ll gain a solid understanding in permaculture foundations and the framework to design your own home in the city or out bush.

Ready to book in? Scroll down to the bottom of the page and go for it!

Immerse yourself in a proactive day of thinking, learning and exploring avenues to respond to some of the biggest social, environmental and economic challenges of our time in a proactive and positive way. Learn the basics in how you can apply permaculture to everything from house design, food production, energy systems and community development, all with a distinct Tasmanian flavour and focus.

.

Your permaculture course has completely changed my focus and approach towards my surroundings. I now have a clear vision and outlook of what I want to achieve In my garden and beyond. I have since been describing your course as a springboard. I left feeling inspired to continue learning more about permaculture and to take the first steps to creating a garden for my family to enjoy.

This course covers… grow-comm-garden-design-ap-2016-ilovepdf-compressed-724x1024

  • Origins of permaculture and the global context
  • Permaculture ethics and principles
  • Design framework
  • Fermentation demonstration
  • Composting demonstration
  • Food production: including food forests and annual gardening
  • Water systems
  • House design for cool climates
  • Social permaculture

Students Receive

  • A copy of the Introduction to Permaculture book by Bill Mollison,
  • Morning and afternoon tea/refreshments
  • Course notes, and
  • New friends and networks.

 

Our teaching approach

We draw on a range of theoretical, interactive and hands-on methods in our teaching style with the intention to make sure our students are engaged and that we’re delivering information as thoroughly as possible. This course is approximately 40% theoretical and 60% interactive (group work and facilitated exercises). This is not a gardening course, if you’re after a hands-on workshop have a look at what we have coming up here. 

untitled-design-9

Your teacher

img_5913-2-293x300Hannah Moloney grew up on a city farm in Brisbane growing herbs and has over 15 years of hands-on experience in designing, building and managing projects around urban agriculture, small-scale farming, permaculture and community development. She has a post-grad diploma in community cultural development, a diploma in permaculture and since 2009, has been teaching permaculture across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute, the Permaforest Trust (which has since closed) and Milkwood Permaculture. She’s taken short courses in teacher training with Rosemary Morrow, the soil food web with Dr Elaine Ingham and reading the landscape with David Holmgren. In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of teaching alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke.

.

.

.

.

 I found it very inspiring, lovely to spend a weekend with like minded people while learning more about how to live sustainably while still enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

Venue

We’re holding this course at the Sustainable Learning Centre in Mt Nelson, Hobart. We’ll provide all details on how to get there for our students just before the course.

Cancellation Policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

Leave a comment

Real Skills for Growing Food at Fat Pig Farm

Two days of hands-on learning, equipping you with the skills to grow food in your own home.

We’re partnering with Fat Pig Farm to bring you two days of hands-on Real Skills for Growing Food. Join Hannah Moloney, Anton Vikstrom and Fat Pig Farm’s market gardener, Jonathon Cooper to learn the basics in growing your own food in small spaces.

Ready to book in? Just scroll down to the bottom of this page.

You’ll get to learn all about…

  • Soil: If you want to grow good food, you’re going to need to know about soil – this is the key to awesome food production. We’ll introduce you to the soil food web and explore a range of soil preparation methods for different contexts.
  • Compost: Learn about composting worms *and* make a hot compost.
  • Propagation: Empower yourself to grow food from scratch – we’ll look at everything from making your own seed raising mix, planting seeds, and growing from cuttings.
  • Vegetable growing: We’ll introduce you to growing both annual and perennial vegetables so you can create diverse, edible garden-scapes.
  • Food forests: How to create perennial, low maintenance, high yielding food systems for small and large areas.

Who should come to this workshop?

We’ve designed this workshop as an introduction for folks wanting to get started in growing their own food and for people looking for some extra guidance in refining their growing skills. If you’re looking for an advanced food growing workshop, this one isn’t for you – but stay tuned as we have big plans for a rather fantastic workshop on this.

tranquility

Students receive

  • Full catering by Fat Pig Farm – it’s going to be delicious,
  • An invitation to an optional dinner on the Saturday night (additional cost applies),
  • Some solid time in Fat Pig Farm’s market garden where you’ll see strategies you can apply to your small or large garden,
  • A copy of The Practical Australian Gardener by Peter Cundall,
  • Vegetable seedlings to get you growing,
  • Extensive course notes on everything we cover over the weekend, and
  • Skills and knowledge useful for the rest of your life!

“The attention to detail was great – this makes everything run smoothly and comfortably. And the gifts were amazing! Not only did I have a wonderful weekend, I came away with so much stuff! Thank you”.

Untitled design (4)

Catering

Fat Pig Farm will spoil you with food to fill your belly, warm your hearts and inspire you to grow your own. Think hearty soups filled with fresh veggies from the garden, Fat Pig ham on bread straight from their wood fired oven, plus cakes and scones inspired by summer’s preserves.

Saturday Night Farm Feast

With Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans & Sadie Chrestman

Untitled design (3)

All students plus their friends and family are invited to join us, Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans and Sadie Chrestman for a yarn and a cider over slow roasted farm grown goodness. Matthew and Sadie will fire up their wood fired oven and roast garden veggies and farm-grown meat. This is what we call a super special treat – not to be missed!

Please note, dinner is an optional extra to the daily workshops and costs an additional $80 per person. This is a wonderful chance to bring your family and friends along to soak up the hands-on learning vibes and enjoy the weekend with you.

 *And yes, we can easily cater for people with different dietary needs.

Fat Pig Farm (1)

Fat Pig Farm is nestled in Glaziers Bay, 10 minutes from Cygnet and is home to Sadie Chrestman and Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans. As a working farm, they run a market garden, mixed fruit and nut orchards, chickens, bees, some milking cows and raise pigs. Thew also have a delightful on farm restaurant, open for weekly lunches and occasional cooking workshops.

How do I get there?

You’ll be provided with clear directions on how to get there prior to the course.

Your Teachers

jono-profile-pic-for-GLP-editJonathon Cooper is the current organic market gardener for Fat Pig Farm and lives in the Huon Valley. He has several years experience working in agriculture, including as co-owner of a diversified 200 acre regenerative farm south of Hobart. He loves working with people to teach them how to grow their own food in whatever space they have available to them. While he focuses on market gardens, he’ll teach you skills transferable to small and tiny spaces, perfect for the urban gardener. You can follow his adventures at Fat Pig Farm here

.
Anton profile pic
Anton Vikstrom
 has well over a decade of hands-on experience in working with urban agriculture. His work includes establishing his homestead in South Hobart (which is shaping up to be an example of urban permaculture at its finest) and designing people’s properties. He is deeply committed to regenerating landscapes, building community, having a good life and supporting others to do the same.

IMG_5913 2

 

Hannah Moloney grew up on a city farm in QLD and is co-founder of the Hobart City Farm. Along with her partner Anton, she is developing their urban homestead into a permaculture haven and has been designing, teaching and implementing urban food gardens and small market gardens for well over a decade. You can read more about Hannah here.

.

 

.

Firstly, thank you for a thoroughly enjoyable and educational course. As experienced growers, we were impressed that you covered so many areas so that inexperienced and experienced growers could walk away with something of value. It was a really positive feeling to walk away with a book, seedlings, trays, seeds, cuttings etc – was most generous and will be a great ongoing reminder of where we started (dead or not ;-)). Thank you so much everyone. You are great bunch!

.

Accommodation

For folks travelling from afar – there are a wealth of local options for you to choose from, CLICK HERE to see a huge range of options put together by our friends at the Cygnet Folk Festival.

Cancellation Policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family – alternatively you’re welcome to put it towards one of our future courses.

Leave a comment

Example Of A Permaculture Student’s Design

We were really impressed by the quality of the work from all the students at our recent permaculture design course. Here’s an example of just one of the group designs completed by some clever, deep thinking folks.

Before we start working with the landscape, the first thing we teach our students is “people analysis”. By getting to know the people living on the land – their needs, desires and capacity you can ensure that any design you create will be a design for *them* and not something you impose onto them. This is possibly the most important thing we try to gently ram into our student’s heads and hearts. We can list too many stories we’ve heard of design jobs gone wrong as a result of people not listening to the client.

Years ago I got to work with Dave Jacke who taught us how to make a goal statement – a present tense statement that summarises what the vision for the design is. This is the outcome of people analysis and functions as a reference point for designing and implementing. This particular design group’s goal statement can be seen below… Notice how you get a strong feeling of what this property is like? That’s what we’re aiming for, rather then specific design solutions.

IMG_7646

The second key step in the design process is to do the “site analysis and assessment” (SAA) process. Simply put, this is where you document what is already on the property (not what you want to design) and the sectors (external energies, i.e. sun, wind, traffic etc) impacting the property.

There is of course a deeper level to this stage as landscapes are already their own “whole”. As designers our job is to read landscapes and differentiate the existing parts and work within those. That’s a really important detail that isn’t always articulated well in permaculture text.

13177361_1730501447168530_8500750921685791284_n

This is also the stage where you’ll naturally start having design ideas like – “oh this sunny section might be the perfect place for a veggie patch”. However as this is such an early stage of the design process we don’t want to get attached to these ideas, as we haven’t gathered all the information yet. So on our SAA summary we make dot points with key titles next to them describing what’s on the landscape (i.e. sunny patch) and arrows beneath them outlining the possible options that could go there (i.e. possible veggie patch). In the work below one example is a small shack (that’s the “dot”), the arrows (design possibilities) beneath this are:

  • possible sleep out
  • water catchment
  • compost loo onsite

The idea is that you don’t get too stuck/attached with one idea at such an early stage of the design process. So you can just take note of them in an orderly manner and get back to them later on when you’ve gathered *all* the information you need to make an informed decision.

IMG_7645

The next step is to crete a concept design. This is a broad design with minimal detail, showing what goes where in a basic “bubble diagram” as seen below.

At this stage you’re still not fixed on a certain approach to the design, rather you’re testing this concept with the people living onsite. Sometimes you’ll make little tweaks other times you might start again, although that’s rare.

IMG_7644

At the same time as doing the concept design, a permaculture zones map is also developing.

Zones are a method of organising your property efficiently according to the phrase “oftenest nearest”. This means you place the things you need most often (herbs, worm farm, kitchen garden) closest to your zone 0 which is the heart of your property (house or workplace). And place the things you need least often (i.e. native plants for small birds, dam, wood lot etc) furtherest away from zone 0 – in your zone 3, 4 or 5. Not all zones need to be included in one property so you wont see all of them all in the example below. You can read more about permaculture zones here. 

IMG_7641

After any tweaks have been made, you’re finally ready to do a final design showing detail around plants, structures, access, water and more. Funnily enough, this is the quickest and easiest stage of designing as you’ve already done extensive ground work leading up to this point.

IMG_7638
This particular landscape the students were design for was really sandy, so they came up with some nifty approaches to building soil for food crops like this hugelkultur style pit for fruit trees and made ace sketches to show how it could work…

IMG_7642

It was such a pleasure to teach/learn with this bunch of hardworking legends. It never ceases to amaze us what transformations can happen over the period of this course!

Interested in learning about permaculture design?

Join us on our upcoming Introduction to Permaculture this May or our part-time Permaculture Design Course this June and July in Hobart.

IMG_7666

Leave a comment

Compost Powered Shower System!

We recently made our first compost powered shower system for our two week permaculture design course held at Okines Community House and Garden.  This is a method originally developed by French man, Jean Pain and has since been replicated and adapted all over the world. While we live in a fairly moderate/cool temperate climate, others with heavy snow also do this to heat water over freezing winters like Ben Falk in Vermont (skip to 2:20 in this video). So you can drop any thoughts you night have that this will only work in a warm climate. Hot compost is hot compost regardless of the climate.

This method is traditionally based on using mostly woodchips and water, we used aged woodchips and aged chook poo (layered fairly evenly) plus water as this is what we had available to us.

  • Before we go any further, we must say a special thanks to our friends over at Very Edible Gardens (VEG) for showing this particular version and answering approximately 100 of our questions.

A brief introduction to hot compost

Hot compost is where you arrange layers of carbon and nitrogen materials like a lasagne with water in between. It needs to be at least one cubic metre for it to heat up, with the desired heat being around 60-65 degrees. This is hot enough to kill off bad pathogens, any hotter and the good biology can suffer. For this particular system we’re wanted it to get as hot as possible as heating water is our focus, not compost for the garden. However saying that, this compost will eventually be used in the local community garden where it was built which will still be beneficial to the soil once it’s had a rest. You can read about how to make hot compost for your garden here. 

First step

Just like making any other hot compost system, layer your carbon and nitrogen materials – weIMG_7385did a couple of layers to establish the footprint of the pile (around 3m in diametre) and set up the internal pipe system. This consisted of four star pickets as the framework and 25mm of poly pipe tied onto it. Dan and Carey from VEG recommended using 100m of 50mm rural poly pipe, but we decided to use 25mm pipe as we could then use it easily on our property once the pile is dismantled. If we had our time again we would use the 50mm – more on that later. 

Second stepIMG_7389

We filled in the polypipe’s centre with layers of woodchips, chook poo and water – basically a mini hot compost system to make sure it would heat up evenly like the rest of the pile. Note the mini bob-cat machine. We hired it for the day as we didn’t have 20 people on hand to shovel the 20m2 of organic materials – it made the job possible and made us laugh. Imagine three people over 6 foot taking it in turns to drive –  like giant clowns in a tiny box car…

Water is key to any hot compost working – we alternated between the sprinkler approach (having it running on top of the internal pile) to having two people stationed there with hoses, watering in each layer thoroughly. You really don’t want any dry patches in your pile as this will preventing it from heating up evenly.

IMG_7391

IMG_7397

.

Step 3

Put wire around the edge of your compost as seen below. This helps you build a pile with as much volume as possible – maximising the space you have and ensuring there’s plenty of mass to heat up. Only once you reach the top of the wire will the pile start to taper off into a pointing tip.

IMG_7406IMG_7409
IMG_7415 IMG_7411

Blake the legend watering in the pile from the top!

The shower stalls

We built the shower block from timber pallets salvaged from building sites and shower bases from the local steep shop, for privacy we covered them in sheets. The stalls were located as close to the compost pile as possible so the hot water leaving the pile didn’t have far to travel – meaning it wasn’t going to cool down before it got to the actual shower head. In the photo below left, you can also see we insulated the hot water pipes leading up to the shower head. 

IMG_7457IMG_7421

 

IMG_7455IMG_7423

 .

The greywater system

We needed to design and build a temporary greywater system to filter the water coming through the IMG_7464shower before it hit the neighbouring wetland. We made a simple, safe and effective bathtub system to do this job. We lined two baths with old doona covers, filled them with coarse woodchips and ran pipes from the showers to them, using gravity to move the water where it needed to go. The woodchips act as a filtering sponge, as water moved through them any grease and soaps were caught meaning the water leaving the system was filtered and safe to enter the beautiful wetlands which lead straight to ocean a few hundred metres away.
IMG_7462IMG_7460

 .

So…. Did it work?

The short answer is yes, we successful showered 30 people over two weeks, averaging around 10-15 each day (spread over the morning and evenings). As expected, people only had short showers up to 5 minutes at the most – which is more then enough. The recharge wait between showers was somewhere between 5 – 15 minutes depending on how many people wanted to have showers.

IMG_7458

15977828_1377889058912002_6377324522689700234_n

Thermometre showing 60 degrees and Anton the babe enjoying his first hot compost shower. 

What would we do differently next time?

Quite a few things…

  • Use bigger pipe (as we were told to do). We used 25mm instead of 50mm pipe as we could easily use that in our irrigation system afterwards. What we didn’t think through properly is that this drastically decreases the volume of water being heated up at any one time in the pile.
  • Cover the pile with the tarpaulin (or any insulating layer, i.e. strawbales) the day we built the compost and not one week later. To be fair, there were *crazy* winds on the day we built the pile so it wasn’t going to work. But a week later, the pile had definitely heated up to 40-50 degrees but the showers were only luke warm at best. So we added the tarpaulin to it and the next morning – boom! The heat was up in the 60s and showers were hot. Our friend Nick from Milkwood tried to reassure us that it would have heated up anyway with a bit more time, as it’s just such a big compost pile. While he’s probably right, the tarp seemed to help bring it home *quickly* which we really needed for the course.
  • Get a longer thermometer stick – the thermometer you can see above only had a stick 45cm long. As the pile was 3m in diametre that meant we couldn’t gauge the centre of the pile’s temperature without digging a little hole in the side and compromising its heat retention capacity. So we just left it to measure the outer edges of the pile – which was still reading around 60 degrees after three weeks.
  • Make the shower stalls a but more weather proof. While it’s summer and mostly warm and lovely in Tassie, we still get days where the wind blows and you reach for your jumper. If we had more time and resources it would have been preferable to make the shower stalls a bit more solid with a roof and solid door. This design would be perfect for the warmer parts of the world!
  • It wasn’t as affordable to build as we had hoped. In the end we had to pay for all organic inputs, hire someone for two days to help build it, buy random bits and pieces and hire the machine – coming in at just under $1500. In theory we were going to source woodchips for free from the Council, organise a community working bee to shovel everything and just pay for some nitrogen (chook poo). Next time, we might think a bit harder about how to bring this price done to make it more viable. Of course, if you live on a farm with lots of resources it’s likely you could do it for under $500.
  • Talk to the school across the road 6 months ago…. We built this pile because we were told there were no showers within easy walking distance. The day before the course, when we were a bit worried about whether the pile would heat up enough (and we eventually added the tarpaulin) I went, stuff it – even though we’ve been told there’s no showers in the school I’ll just go check. Turns out there was a whole shower block 150m from us and they handed me the key in two minutes and happily let us use it as a back up for the two week course. To say we felt a but silly is a gigantic understatement – swear words were mentioned. On the major up side, we got to build a compost powered shower, how cool is that!!! I’ve wanted to do it for years and overall, learning new skills trumps feelings of silly-ness (eventually).

Would we do it again?

For shizzle! Despite the long list of “stuff ups” above, I’m so pumped for this method of heating water. For years it’s been on my list of awesome things I want to do – adding to my skill set and now it’s firmly lodged in my head, heart and hands. I look forward to making our next compost shower – it’s going to be a walk in the park after all the things we learned from this time round!

7 Comments

Permaculture Design Course Farm Stays

For our summer Permaculture Design Course (PDC) this Jan 21 – Feb 3, 2017, we’re organising some hands-on farm stay opportunities for our students to head to directly after the PDC.  We’ve designed these farm stays specifically for students who’d like to back up the theory with some practical work to take their permaculture design and implementation skills into the practical world. While there are many fantastic urban and rural permaculture properties around Tasmania, here’s a small hand full of the ones we’ve got on board for students to choose from – they’re awesome.

The Little Seed Farm

Franklin, 45mts south of Hobart

Penny

Welcome to Penny and Wayne’s home, a 15-acre Permaculture and Land for Wildlife property overlooking the Huon River, with a strawbale home and earthen floors.

  • What will you learn?  A typical February includes tasks such as annual vege succession planting, maintaining the fruit trees, applying sea weed and/or compost tea solutions, harvesting and preserving, rotating the chooks and cleaning out their house, weeding and making compost.
  • Please sign up to Wwoofing Australia before applying to do you farm stay here.
  • Accommodation is inside or camping for up to 6 people
  • Please note this opportunity is available from Thurs 9th to Mon 13th Feb and there is no smoking on this property – thanks.

Lance & Olga

Lorinna, 2 hours NW of Launceston and about 45mts from Sheffield

 .
Lance+Olga
Meet Lance and Olga and their rather amazing house in process. These guys are some of Tasmania’s most committed and skilled natural builders – plus Olga works as a midwife, they’re very talented. I realise their house is covered in snow in the photo above which *shouldn’t* be the case in mid summer!
  • What will you learn with these guys? Natural building. They’re in the process of building an amazing house with earth, straw, timber and recycled materials.
  • These guys are about to be registered with helpX, please sign up before applying to join these two spunks.
  • Accommodation is either in their cosy timber A-frame or camping – it depends who gets in first!  

Good Life Permaculture’s Urban Homestead

Central Hobart, 3kms from the centre of the city

Good life

That’s right, for the first time we’ll be opening up our home for one week for two of our students once they’ve completed the PDC.

  • What will folks learn at our home? Small scale fruit and vegetable production, top bar beekeeping, how to make home brew, cooking from scratch, small livestock (chooks and ducks) and you’ll probably be hounded by our little Frida Maria to play with her in the sandpit – she’s very friendly.
  • Accommodation is either camping or inside (depends on whether we finish building the spare room by then).

How to Apply?

These options are only available to students who have registered for our Permaculture Design Course running from 21 Jan – 3 Feb, 2017 in southern Tasmania. Once you have done this, simply scroll down below and click on the option you would like to take up. We’ll then get in touch to sort out some of the finer details and connect you with your farm stay host.

Please note, to qualify for these opportunities the following guidelines apply

  • You need to join either helpX or Wwoof Australia (depending on who your host is registered with).
  • On average, people are expected to work 4-6 hours per day in exchange for food, a place to sleep and good conversation. These hours will be clarified on application.
  • All farms listed have a two day period to see whether you all get along, if not they have the right to ask you to leave.
Leave a comment

Permaculture Design Certificate

growing3

21 January – 3 February, 2017, Dodges Ferry, Southern Tasmania

Join us for two weeks of deep permaculture design learning. You’ll leave this course knowing how to design resilient, robust landscapes & people-scapes in a  beautiful learning environment.

This Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) has been structured so you get to design your own property of choice, plus complete a permaculture design for a real life client and property. This provides you the opportunity to test and practice permaculture designing in a range of contexts with the support of experienced designers and practitioners right at your side to step you through it all.

This workshop has now sold out. Pop your name on the waiting list at the bottom of the page – just in case!

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

.

I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita).

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…
Louden-Version2-724x1024

  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus more. View the full course schedule here. 

.

.

Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha).

 

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

3

What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

As part of your course fee you receive…

DSC07590-1024x681

  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • Course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Pip Permaculture Magazine
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

.

The Teaching Team

All members of our teaching team have completed Permaculture Teaching Training with Rosemary Morrow, meaning you’ll get a learning experience like no other!

IMG_5913 2

YOUR LEAD TEACHER: Hannah Moloney is a professional permaculture designer who works with urban and rural land holders to design landscapes that are true to them and the surrounding environment. She completed her Permaculture Design Course in 2008, her Permaculture Diploma in 2011, has a post-graduate diploma in community cultural development and has been designing and building permaculture gardens and working on community projects that create positive change since 2001. She’s been teaching permaculture since 2009 across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute, Milkwood Permaculture and at home in Tasmania with Good Life Permaculture.

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke (US author of Edible Forest Gardens). In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

.

2c7e026YOUR *SPECIAL* GUEST: Nick Ritar from Milkwood will join us for two days of greatness. He is a permaculture designer, consultant and educator who works extensively across a wide range of bioregions, farms, watersheds and city environments. He is recognized nationally as a leading advocate on how permaculture principles can contribute to food security through good design and regenerative farming and living.

He and his partner, Kirsten Bradley (and their little Ashar) are on the verge of moving to Melliodora, home to Sue Dennett and David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture). They’re completing a one-year, land based residency where they’ll co-manage the property and share this experience online and through their teaching, meaning everyone coming on this PDC will benefit.

.

jono-profile-pic-for-GLP-edit

 

YOUR LOCAL GUEST TEACHER # 1: Jonathon Cooper is the current organic market gardener for Fat Pig Farm and lives in the Huon Valley. He has several years experience working in agriculture, including as co-owner of a diversified 200 acre regenerative farm south of Hobart. He also has a long history in working with a range of businesses and community organisations to establish strong community-based food production and distribution systems. He’s passionate about empowering people to get involved with the future of their food. You can follow his adventures at Fat Pig Farm here. 

.

 

20160529_122131
YOUR LOCAL GUEST TEACHER # 2
: Danny Lees has an enormous amount of practical experience in horticulture, permaculture and sustainable building. Specialising in garden design and implementation, he’s worked with Hobart’s leading edible landscaping business, FIMBY and some of Tasmania’s most renowned sustainable builders.  In addition to his PDC, he’s completed short courses in Advanced Permaculture Design and Permaculture Teacher Training.

When he’s not immersed in growing and building, you’ll most likely find him doing acrobatics and eating cake..

.

.

Thanks for being awesome! Thanks also for the shared life-experiences/knowledge of the teachers. One thing that really stood-out for me was the “people care” of the students, and everyone really, throughout the two weeks. I have never before experienced this in the many workshops, courses and places of learning/study that I have attended. My wish is that such a thing becomes the “normal” way of being – YEAH!

Venue

We’re holding this course at the vibrant Okines Community House and garden in Dodges Ferry, southern Tasmania. This active community hub features a food co-op, beautiful community garden, a pizza oven and is located near a local surf beach – it’s a rocking place!

2

Accommodation

We provide free camping (BYO all your own gear) onsite with access to toilets, showers and inside spaces to relax in.

If you’d prefer to not camp, there are also local places you can stay independently, have a look at a large selection herehere and here. 

Post PDC Farm Stays

*This is rather exciting*… We’ve organised free post PDC farm stays for some of our students who’d like to back up the PDC with hands-on skill development with folks already living the good life. You can see what farms we have on board and book in HERE.  

Good-life

One Full PDC Scholarship on Offer!

In the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to a lucky someone. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

All applications should address these two points and can be sent to Hannah at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au by December 1st, 2016.

Catering

We provide nutritious and delicious vegetarian food for the entire course and can cater for a large range of dietary needs with wholesome, locally sourced and organic food where possible.

Untitled design (1)

Surf & Yoga Rejuvenation Day

unnamed (1)

This PDC has one rest day (Saturday 28th January). On this day there is an option for a limited amount of students to book in for a soulful surf and yoga day out with local surfer, Claire Boost and yogi, Gabrielle Gartrell. Experience the relaxed yet active vibe of surf and yoga culture at one of Hobart’s most popular surf beaches, here in Dodges Ferry.


unnamed
This package includes two, one hour yoga sessions in a waterfront yoga studio and two one hour surf lessons. Perfect for first time beginners or those who want to progress to peeling waves and simple manoeuvres. Lunch, morning and afternoon tea will be served on the beach from gourmet, fresh produce food truck AliCart.

You can book in this day of awesome for an additional $155 below (usually $255). You’re also welcome to get touch with Claire directly for more info at laboosta@gmail.com.

**All surf and yoga equipment is provided on the day.

.

How to get to the PDC

Dodges Ferry is approximately 45 minutes from Hobart and 30 minutes from the Hobart airport.

  • By Boat: If you’re coming from Melbourne, Victoria – you can catch the boat (a 12 hour journey) from Port Melbourne to Devonport. From Devonport it is a 4 hour drive to Dodges Ferry.  To see the timetable and book your ticket visit the Spirit of Tasmania
  • By car: If you’re driving to the course and have a spare seat you’re willing to offer to another student, please get in touch so we can help connect you. It’s also well worth checking out Cool Pool Tas, Tasmania’s very own car pooling network! There is easy bike and car parking at the venue in an off street car park.
  • By bus: There are regular buses traveling from Hobart to Dodges Ferry, check out the timetable here.
  • By plane: The closest airports to Dodges Ferry is the Hobart airport. Check out the webjet website to find the most affordable deal. To get to Dodges Ferry from the airport your options are to hire a car, or talk to us about organising a carpooling arrangement with a fellow student or a possible bulk pick up.

2

 

Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full be the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can talk details.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

Leave a comment