Posts tagged ‘permaculture australia’

Permaculture Design Course

19 January – 2 February, 2018, Dodges Ferry, Southern Tasmania

Join us for two weeks of deep permaculture design learning. You’ll leave this course knowing how to design resilient, robust landscapes & people-scapes in a  beautiful learning environment.

This Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) has been structured so you get to design your own property of choice, plus complete a permaculture design for a real life client and property. This provides you the opportunity to test and practice permaculture designing in a range of contexts with the support of experienced designers and practitioners right at your side to step you through it all.

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

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I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita).

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…
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  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus more. View the full course schedule here. 

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Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha).

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

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What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

As part of your course fee you receive…

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  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • Course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Pip Permaculture Magazine
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

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The Teaching Team

Stay tuned for our full teaching team to be announced in the coming months. 

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YOUR LEAD TEACHER: Hannah Moloney is a professional permaculture designer who works with urban and rural land holders to design landscapes that are true to them and the surrounding environment. She completed her Permaculture Design Course in 2008, her Permaculture Diploma in 2011, has a post-graduate diploma in community cultural development and has been designing and building permaculture gardens and working on community projects that create positive change since 2001. She’s been teaching permaculture since 2009 across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute, Milkwood Permaculture and at home in Tasmania with Good Life Permaculture.

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke (US author of Edible Forest Gardens). In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

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Thanks for being awesome! Thanks also for the shared life-experiences/knowledge of the teachers. One thing that really stood-out for me was the “people care” of the students, and everyone really, throughout the two weeks. I have never before experienced this in the many workshops, courses and places of learning/study that I have attended. My wish is that such a thing becomes the “normal” way of being – YEAH!

Venue

We’re holding this course at the vibrant Okines Community House and garden in Dodges Ferry, southern Tasmania. This active community hub features a food co-op, beautiful community garden, a pizza oven and is located near a local surf beach – it’s a rocking place!

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Accommodation

We provide free camping (BYO all your own gear) onsite with access to toilets, showers and inside spaces to relax in.

If you’d prefer to not camp, there are also local places you can stay independently, have a look at a large selection herehere and here. 

Post PDC Farm Stays

We’ll be organising free post PDC farm stays for some of our students who’d like to back up the PDC with hands-on skill development with folks already living the good life. Stay tuned for what farms will be available.

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One Full PDC Scholarship on Offer!

In the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to a lucky someone. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

To apply CLICK HERE. 

Catering

We provide nutritious and delicious vegetarian food for the entire course and can cater for a large range of dietary needs with wholesome, locally sourced and organic food where possible.

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How to get to the PDC

Dodges Ferry is approximately 45 minutes from Hobart and 30 minutes from the Hobart airport.

  • By Boat: If you’re coming from Melbourne, Victoria – you can catch the boat (a 12 hour journey) from Port Melbourne to Devonport. From Devonport it is a 4 hour drive to Dodges Ferry.  To see the timetable and book your ticket visit the Spirit of Tasmania
  • By car: If you’re driving to the course and have a spare seat you’re willing to offer to another student, please get in touch so we can help connect you. It’s also well worth checking out Cool Pool Tas, Tasmania’s very own car pooling network! There is easy bike and car parking at the venue in an off street car park.
  • By bus: There are regular buses traveling from Hobart to Dodges Ferry, check out the timetable here.
  • By plane: The closest airports to Dodges Ferry is the Hobart airport. Check out the webjet website to find the most affordable deal. To get to Dodges Ferry from the airport your options are to hire a car, or talk to us about organising a carpooling arrangement with a fellow student or a possible bulk pick up.

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Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full be the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can talk details.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

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Part-time Permaculture Design Certificate

Based in and around Hobart, this part-time Permaculture Design Course is designed for all you folk who need to keep on working, parenting and all round general living. Over a series of 5 weekends covering 2 months, students will learn how to design resilient and robust permaculture systems for their own (and others) lives and landscapes.

*Ready to book in? Just scroll down to the bottom of this page*

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  • Weekend 1: June 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th
  • Weekend 2: June 17th – 18th
  • Weekend 3: July 1st – 2nd
  • Weekend 4: July 15th – 16th
  • Weekend 5: July 29th – 30th

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…
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  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus more. View the full course schedule here. 

 

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, local government staff, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

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So good!! I learned heaps, met interesting people and got mad inspired. Even better than I’d hoped and my expectations were high (student from our Summer 2017 PDC).

What this course isn’t

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

Your teaching team

img_5913-2-293x300Hannah Moloney is a professional permaculture designer and teacher who works with urban and rural land holders to design landscapes that are true to them and the surrounding environment. She completed her Permaculture Design Course in 2008, her Permaculture Diploma in 2011, has a post-graduate diploma in community cultural development and has been designing and building permaculture gardens and working on community projects that create positive change since 2001. She’s been teaching permaculture since 2009 across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute, Milkwood Permaculture and at home in Tasmania with Good Life Permaculture.

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke (US author of Edible Forest Gardens). In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

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Nick Towle
is a passionate advocate for sustainability and permaculture and brings a diverse set of skills to the course including home-based sustainability practices and community economic systems. His most recent permaculture adventure has involved establishing the RESEED Trust, a two acre urban property in the heart of Penguin (NW Tasmania) which is being developed into a permaculture demonstration site and sustainability education centre.

 

IMG_6691Anton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist with over 15 years experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development, energy efficiency and sustainability. Anton is one of those rare breeds with both deep theoretical knowledge and practical capabilities. Over the years, this has seen him work for the Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Sustainable Living Tasmania. At the same time he has finally honed his practical skills in everything from off-grid solar power, carpentry, landscaping, brewing beers and wines, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

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Excellent! I knew it was going to be good, but everything exceeded my expectations (student from our summer 2017 PDC).

Venue

This course will be held across a range of venues in and around Hobart. Stay tuned for more details.

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Your course fees includes

  • Extensive course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Pip Permaculture Magazine
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

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Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full be the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can sort out the details.

One full scholarship on offer!

As always, in the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to a lucky someone. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

You can complete your application HERE.  Applications close on May 1st – 5pm. 

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

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Example Of A Permaculture Student’s Design

We were really impressed by the quality of the work from all the students at our recent permaculture design course. Here’s an example of just one of the group designs completed by some clever, deep thinking folks.

Before we start working with the landscape, the first thing we teach our students is “people analysis”. By getting to know the people living on the land – their needs, desires and capacity you can ensure that any design you create will be a design for *them* and not something you impose onto them. This is possibly the most important thing we try to gently ram into our student’s heads and hearts. We can list too many stories we’ve heard of design jobs gone wrong as a result of people not listening to the client.

Years ago I got to work with Dave Jacke who taught us how to make a goal statement – a present tense statement that summarises what the vision for the design is. This is the outcome of people analysis and functions as a reference point for designing and implementing. This particular design group’s goal statement can be seen below… Notice how you get a strong feeling of what this property is like? That’s what we’re aiming for, rather then specific design solutions.

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The second key step in the design process is to do the “site analysis and assessment” (SAA) process. Simply put, this is where you document what is already on the property (not what you want to design) and the sectors (external energies, i.e. sun, wind, traffic etc) impacting the property.

There is of course a deeper level to this stage as landscapes are already their own “whole”. As designers our job is to read landscapes and differentiate the existing parts and work within those. That’s a really important detail that isn’t always articulated well in permaculture text.

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This is also the stage where you’ll naturally start having design ideas like – “oh this sunny section might be the perfect place for a veggie patch”. However as this is such an early stage of the design process we don’t want to get attached to these ideas, as we haven’t gathered all the information yet. So on our SAA summary we make dot points with key titles next to them describing what’s on the landscape (i.e. sunny patch) and arrows beneath them outlining the possible options that could go there (i.e. possible veggie patch). In the work below one example is a small shack (that’s the “dot”), the arrows (design possibilities) beneath this are:

  • possible sleep out
  • water catchment
  • compost loo onsite

The idea is that you don’t get too stuck/attached with one idea at such an early stage of the design process. So you can just take note of them in an orderly manner and get back to them later on when you’ve gathered *all* the information you need to make an informed decision.

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The next step is to crete a concept design. This is a broad design with minimal detail, showing what goes where in a basic “bubble diagram” as seen below.

At this stage you’re still not fixed on a certain approach to the design, rather you’re testing this concept with the people living onsite. Sometimes you’ll make little tweaks other times you might start again, although that’s rare.

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At the same time as doing the concept design, a permaculture zones map is also developing.

Zones are a method of organising your property efficiently according to the phrase “oftenest nearest”. This means you place the things you need most often (herbs, worm farm, kitchen garden) closest to your zone 0 which is the heart of your property (house or workplace). And place the things you need least often (i.e. native plants for small birds, dam, wood lot etc) furtherest away from zone 0 – in your zone 3, 4 or 5. Not all zones need to be included in one property so you wont see all of them all in the example below. You can read more about permaculture zones here. 

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After any tweaks have been made, you’re finally ready to do a final design showing detail around plants, structures, access, water and more. Funnily enough, this is the quickest and easiest stage of designing as you’ve already done extensive ground work leading up to this point.

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This particular landscape the students were design for was really sandy, so they came up with some nifty approaches to building soil for food crops like this hugelkultur style pit for fruit trees and made ace sketches to show how it could work…

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It was such a pleasure to teach/learn with this bunch of hardworking legends. It never ceases to amaze us what transformations can happen over the period of this course!

Interested in learning about permaculture design?

Join us on our upcoming Introduction to Permaculture this May or our part-time Permaculture Design Course this June and July in Hobart.

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Permaculture Design Course Farm Stays

For our summer Permaculture Design Course (PDC) this Jan 21 – Feb 3, 2017, we’re organising some hands-on farm stay opportunities for our students to head to directly after the PDC.  We’ve designed these farm stays specifically for students who’d like to back up the theory with some practical work to take their permaculture design and implementation skills into the practical world. While there are many fantastic urban and rural permaculture properties around Tasmania, here’s a small hand full of the ones we’ve got on board for students to choose from – they’re awesome.

The Little Seed Farm

Franklin, 45mts south of Hobart

Penny

Welcome to Penny and Wayne’s home, a 15-acre Permaculture and Land for Wildlife property overlooking the Huon River, with a strawbale home and earthen floors.

  • What will you learn?  A typical February includes tasks such as annual vege succession planting, maintaining the fruit trees, applying sea weed and/or compost tea solutions, harvesting and preserving, rotating the chooks and cleaning out their house, weeding and making compost.
  • Please sign up to Wwoofing Australia before applying to do you farm stay here.
  • Accommodation is inside or camping for up to 6 people
  • Please note this opportunity is available from Thurs 9th to Mon 13th Feb and there is no smoking on this property – thanks.

Lance & Olga

Lorinna, 2 hours NW of Launceston and about 45mts from Sheffield

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Meet Lance and Olga and their rather amazing house in process. These guys are some of Tasmania’s most committed and skilled natural builders – plus Olga works as a midwife, they’re very talented. I realise their house is covered in snow in the photo above which *shouldn’t* be the case in mid summer!
  • What will you learn with these guys? Natural building. They’re in the process of building an amazing house with earth, straw, timber and recycled materials.
  • These guys are about to be registered with helpX, please sign up before applying to join these two spunks.
  • Accommodation is either in their cosy timber A-frame or camping – it depends who gets in first!  

Good Life Permaculture’s Urban Homestead

Central Hobart, 3kms from the centre of the city

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That’s right, for the first time we’ll be opening up our home for one week for two of our students once they’ve completed the PDC.

  • What will folks learn at our home? Small scale fruit and vegetable production, top bar beekeeping, how to make home brew, cooking from scratch, small livestock (chooks and ducks) and you’ll probably be hounded by our little Frida Maria to play with her in the sandpit – she’s very friendly.
  • Accommodation is either camping or inside (depends on whether we finish building the spare room by then).

How to Apply?

These options are only available to students who have registered for our Permaculture Design Course running from 21 Jan – 3 Feb, 2017 in southern Tasmania. Once you have done this, simply scroll down below and click on the option you would like to take up. We’ll then get in touch to sort out some of the finer details and connect you with your farm stay host.

Please note, to qualify for these opportunities the following guidelines apply

  • You need to join either helpX or Wwoof Australia (depending on who your host is registered with).
  • On average, people are expected to work 4-6 hours per day in exchange for food, a place to sleep and good conversation. These hours will be clarified on application.
  • All farms listed have a two day period to see whether you all get along, if not they have the right to ask you to leave.
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Okines Community Garden

45 minutes east of Hobart is a little town called Dodges Ferry, tucked in against some sweet little surf beaches. There are many great things about this stretch of coast, one of them is this place, Okines Community Garden. We happen to be holding our 2017 summer Permaculture Design Course and thought you might like a little look around…

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img_6189This garden is particularly ace due to having Gabe and Claire on board (the two groovers you can see to the left) as part-time coordinators to make things happen. Their knowledge, skill and natural flair for greatness really bring this space to life. I *always* love coming here to see the flourishing orchard, veggies, art, chooks and their community in action. Seriously, it’s rare to have such vibrance in community gardens, people always dropping in, working in the food co-op, gardening, talking. It’s good, really good.

The concept of the garden has evolved over time, but at its core it’s obvious that it holds a strong flame for community development, providing a space that people really *want* to be in.

Some of the key things they have focused on creating, or are looking to create include:

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  • a herb labyrinth
  • sale of produce via the market
  • involvement of students from the Dodges Ferry Primary School
  • cooking classes with the fresh produce
  • helping needy people in the community
  • growing native and fruit trees
  • depot for green waste
  • a mulcher for community use
  • an experimental garden to determine best plants for the area
  • workshops to teach growing techniques and crop rotation etc.

One of our past students is a Dodges Ferry local and she was raving about this garden to me. In particular their pizza oven which her family uses regularly – it’s an extension of their kitchen, their home. How cool is that.

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Next door to their cranking pizza oven is a small food co-op run by the community. I love seeing these simple set ups – it’s all you need to distribute good food to folks.

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Their labyrinth  is on the edge of a small wetland, home to a b’zillion frogs and little critters. As well as growing food, these guys are also committed to regenerating the local native plants and water systems of this area, creating a beautiful and much needed balance. An indicator of their success is their resident bandicoots and echidnas. And yes, that’s the ocean you can see in the background, a refreshing (that’s code for cold Tassie water) swimming beach a short stroll from the garden.

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Claire and Gabe are on site Mondays 9:00 am to 4 pm, Wednesdays 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm and Thursdays 10:30 am to 3 pm. Pop in, say g’day, get involved and fall in love with this wonderful space. You can also get in touch with them at dig@okinescommunityhouse.com.au.

We’re holding our summer Permaculture Design Course in the Okines community house, directly next to this great space. Students will have the option of camping on site and really soak up the space over a two week period. If you’d like to find out more info, get in touch for a yarn at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au or 0418 307 294.

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Introduction To Small-Scale Beekeeping

A one day introduction course designed for the beginner and novice beekeeper keen to have one (or a few) hives in their homes. We’ll guide you through the key foundations of bee theory and action so that by the end of the day you’ll be either ready to start on your bee journey, add to it or refine it.

This workshop is now sold out, however you can pop your name on the waiting list at the bottom of this page.

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This workshop will

  • Provide the theory you need to get started in beekeeping
  • Discuss the importance of bees in our food systems, key threats to their health and how you can help them out
  • Show you three different types of hives – the langstroth, warre and top bar beehive and how they work so you can make an informed decision for your own place
  • Open a live hive so you can see how to manage and work with bees on a practical level
  • Introduce you to some of the simple and best tools to utilise as a beginner beekeeper

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Students receive

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  • A bee veil suitable as a “backup/spare” veil
  • Morning and afternoon tea and treats (BYO lunch).
  •  A whole bunch of new bee friends and networks to stay in contact with.
  • Course notes, jam packed with information to support you to be a gun beekeeper!

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Your Teachers

Anton profile picAnton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist (and a self confessed renaissance man) with over 15 years experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development, energy efficiency and sustainability. In recent years, honey bees have crept into his list of passions and he currently keeps top bar hives and is looking to expand in numbers and types this season. Anton is one of those rare breeds with both deep theoretical knowledge and practical capabilities. Over the years, this has seen him work for the Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Sustainable Living Tasmania. At the same time he has finally honed his practical skills in everything from off-grid solar power, carpentry, landscaping, brewing beers and wines, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

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IMG_2721 James Da Costa grew up on the NW coast of Tasmania and currently living in lovely Hobart town. He has been keeping bees on a backyard scale for the past 4 years and throughout this time has been collecting and re-homing swarms and wild colonies of honey bees. He currently manages around 5 hives in suburban settings, is a founding member of the Hobart City Farm and has a background in permaculture design, community engagement and small-scale food systems. Over the past two years he has been building and sampling the workings of a few different hive designs and is interested in the effects of these designs on bee health, behaviour and how their unique designs and construction methods lend themselves to people’s diverse situations.

 

Venue

We’re hosting this workshop in two venues – the Taroona High School and Picnic Basket Cafe where we have a range of active beehives to show you. The venues are a short 5 minute car drive between the two. We’ll provide students with maps and further information closer to the course.

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Cancellation policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family – alternatively you’re welcome to put it towards one of our future courses.

Feeling keen? You can read more about different types of beehives here.

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Permaculture Design Course

Join internationally renowned permaculturalist, Rosemary Morrow, and special guests for two weeks of life changing permaculture learning. You’ll learn how to design resilient and robust permaculture systems for your own (and others) lives and landscapes in a supportive and beautiful learning environment.

– Ready to book your place? Simply scroll down to the bottom of this page –

The PDC has been structured so you get to design your own property of choice, plus complete a permaculture design for a real life client and property. This provides you the opportunity to test and practice permaculture designing in a range of contexts with the support of experienced designers and practitioners right at your side to step you through it all.

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

 

I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita, PDC student 2014).

Fieldtrips

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…

  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus lots more!

 

Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha, 2014 student).

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What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up!

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As part of your course fee you receive…

  • A two week life changing learning experience
  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • A copy of the Permaculture Designer’s Manual (Bill Mollison) which retails at $120
  • Course resources
  • Permaculture Design Certificate
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends

Your teachers…

Rosemary_Morrow2_fmtRosemary is a well-known, respected permaculture teacher and practitioner who is also very down to earth. For almost 40 years she has worked extensively with farmers and villagers in Africa, Central and South East Asia and Eastern Europe. Rosemary has a special commitment to the people of war-torn nations such as Vietnam, Cambodia, Bosnia and Afghanistan.

In between her overseas work Rosemary has developed several of her own properties in the Blue Mountains. Using permaculture principles the properties have become models for sustainable living.

Rosemary is the author of ‘The Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture’ and ‘The Earth User’s Guide to Teaching Permaculture’ (supplied to all students) and is also a co-founder with Lis Bastian of The Blue Mountains Permaculture Institute.

 

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Nick Towle is a passionate advocate for sustainability and permaculture and brings a diverse set of skills to the course including home-based sustainability practices and community economic systems. His most recent permaculture adventure has involved establishing the RESEED Trust, a two acre urban property in the heart of Penguin (NW Tasmania) which is being developed into a permaculture demonstration site and sustainability education centre.

We also draw on further local teachers to bring a depth of experiences to the course.

And in the background you’ll have…

Hannah + Kale

Hannah Moloney is a full time permaculture practitioner specialising in urban agriculture and community development. She has over 10 years of practical experience in designing, building and managing permaculture based projects. Hannah divides her time between teaching permaculture, designing, managing permaculture projects and establishing a small city farm with her partner, Anton Vikstrom, in their Hobart home. You can read more about Hannah here.  She’s currently on maternity leave, but will be spending time in and around the PDC to volunteer her expertise and have a good time!

 

 

Anton-profile-pic1Anton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist (and a self confessed renaissance man) with over 15 years experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development, energy efficiency and sustainability. Anton is one of those rare breeds with both deep theoretical knowledge and practical capabilities. Over the years, this has seen him work for the Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Sustainable Living Tasmania. At the same time he has finally honed his practical skills in everything from off-grid solar power, carpentry, landscaping, brewing beers and wines, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

 

The Venue

This course is being held at Tarremah Steiner School, approximately 15 minutes south of Hobart city. The buildings and grounds are incredibly welcoming and create a healthy, beautiful and fun learning environment.

Tarremah Photos

Arrival Time & Daily Schedule

While the actual course starts on Saturday 4th April, we’re asking students to arrive on the evening of the 3rd at 4pm to set up camp, have dinner with us and settle in. This will ensure that we’re ready to get started on time the following day. Each day we’ll have four different sessions, starting at 8:30am and finishing at 5pm with ample breaks (and scrumptious food). The evening’s will largely be yours to relax, study, design and think (so much thinking and reflecting to do). However we’ll also run regular casual evening sessions to make sure you get the most from the course.

Accommodation

We supply free camping onsite, please bring all your own camping gear. We strongly recommend you stay on site for the duration of the course as there are optional evening activities which are highly beneficial. It’s also an incredible opportunity to immerse youself in this unique learning experience which gives you SO MUCH when you’re able to be there 100%.

What to bring with you

  • All your camping gear including tent, sleeping mat, sheets, sleeping bag, pillow, teddy bear etc
  • Torch
  • Boots,
  • Rain coat,
  • Hat,
  • Sun shirt
  • Sunscreen,
  • Note book and pens
  • Towel
  • Warm clothes
  • A hearty appetite for learning

Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture learning experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and innovative teachers in Australia and the world
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • We pay for a one-year membership to a relevant organisation of your choice, so even after you leave the course we’ll still be supporting you in getting informed and connected with permaculture networks and resources.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll receive a Permaculture Design Certificate which means you’re qualified to be a permaculture practitioner, teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards a Diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we’ll organise a system that suits you best.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll refund your fee, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

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Interview with Rosemary Morrow

A permaculturist since the 80’s, Rosemary Morrow is based in the Blue Mountains (NSW) and is internationally renowned for her top notch design skills, her ground breaking teaching techniques and her commitment to working with, and for, people who need it most. She tirelessly works across the world including East Timor, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Europe, Solomon Islands, Africa, Vietnam and more. She ooozes integrity, is one of the most down to earth people you’ll come across and is surprisingly short. But don’t’ let this little pocket rocket deceive you, she achieves more in a morning than most and baffles and inspires me with her stamina, enthusiasm and strong character.
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Rosemary is the lead teacher on our upcoming Permaculture Design Course this April 3rd-18th, so we thought we’d introduce you to her so you can get a good sense of this dynamic, talented woman.
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How long have you been a permaculturalist?

Well I started looking in 1978 and then I did my PDC with Robin Francis in 1986 and so from those times.   Perhaps I was a ‘natural’ in a sense because consumption and materialism has always been a bit dubious for me.  It is never, ever boring.  The world simply goes on fascinating and intriguing me, with its possibilities from a design view point.
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What does permaculture mean to you and you life?

I think this was succinctly put by Bill Mollison (co-founder of permaculture) when he said:  Permaculture enables what is morally required and scientifically necessary. So for me, a scientist with moral learnings and wanting to be part of the solution and stop being part of the problem, permaculture through its principles and strategies meant that I didn’t have to do my own research, nor put together my own framework. It fell into place and gave my life foundations and meaning. I love living permaculture because the techniques are not always evident and so there is always room for creative personal response.

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RosemaryMorrow-teaching-e1377107951274How can permaculture help shape a more healthy, sustainable and just world?

Permaculture is about designing strategies for the world that are based on caring for the earth, caring for people and caring for future generations. Within a framework of ethics and principles inspired by nature and by the best that previous cultures had to offer, permaculture offers much toward shaping a more healthy, sustainable and just world.

The way permaculture is taught, and has spread from the grassroots up, has meant that permaculture ideas have spread rapidly around the world, particularly in those places that need it most.
We are presently going through an explosion of permaculture into minds and disciplines more diverse that I think David or Bill ever expected.  For example, my colleague, Lis Bastian, lectures in environmental management for a Bachelors Degree in the international hospitality industry, and permaculture is included in the text for that course. Her students come from over 40 nationalities and will spread these ideas through an industry that is the largest employer in the world.  So you can imagine what will happen to the health of the world when these young students graduate.
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Is permaculture relevant to people who live in the rural AND urban environments?

I wasn’t sure about urban conglomerations until I saw Hong Kong and met with local permaculturists with their myriads to ideas, techniques, and determination.  The whole of the Hong Kong Botanic Gardens and offices are permaculturally designed.  And for rural environments, permaculture will rehabilitate all lands.  I can’t think of anything else that will.  However permaculture does need to improve its content for coastal areas under threat from climate change and rising seas, something I’m working on now.

What type of people would find permaculture useful to integrate into their lives?

It is harder to think whether there are any people who would not find permaculture useful. From premiers and kings, men and women in prisons and in every situation people are always better off adopting permaculture into their lives. Whether its cutting bills for energy, and growing food to running community gardens and local banking – it touches all areas of human lives.

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What projects are you working on at the moment?

The two most exciting ones are:

1) fortnightly Skype sessions with young Afghanis who are peace volunteers and want permaculture for when peace comes.  They are funny and committed and hugely keen to learn.  And yet, we tremble when we read of the escalating numbers of civilians dying in Afghanistan and we worry about when and how a just peace can be brought about.
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2) more challenging  terms of the environment for a small lagoon community in the Solomon Islands which offers a model of how permaculture can respond to vulnerable villages who may not get access to higher land.   It is testing and fascinating. And we cannot go quickly!   The answers may not lie in land solutions, rather in finding ethical incomes for the villagers. You can follow these two projects (and more) through Blue Mountains Permaculture Institute.
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Rosemary-MorrowAnd it is time for me to put nearly 40 years of full-time permaculture projects – failures and successes up on the web for everyone to read. When I think back about outcomes from Vietnam, Cambodia, Albania, East Timor and so on, it is apparent that permaculture has so much to contribute and I’d like people not to have to ‘reinvent the wheel’ by learning from my experiences.
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I also do Skype sessions with Miami, Chile, Argentina and so on.  Plus I have a commitment of some degree to the youth of southern Europe with their huge unemployment and so I’ve worked there for the past two years or so and now I am lucky to be invited to work in Greece in a very economically depressed community. The organiser is a brilliant young Greek-Australian permaculturists who has returned to Greece to be part of their future.

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Rosemary is the lead teacher on our upcoming Permaculture Design Course taking place in southern Tasmania from the 3rd – 18th April. You can understand why we’re excited to have her, it’s going to be a pretty special course with Rosemary at the helm – why not join us! Click here for more information and to register.

**You can follow Rosemary’s work through the Blue Mountains Permaculture Institute, NSW.

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What actually happens on a Permaculture Design Course?

Well, lots of things – both planned and spontaneous and all good. Being a design course, we focus on design and creating designers out of all the students we work with – that’s our key focus and priority. To support good design we integrate practical activities and site visits throughout the course… But at the end of the day we focus on design. Here’s a snapshot of our current part-time Permaculture Design Course which we’re half way through, and loving.

The students have just completed their first ‘practice run’ design projects, here’s a look at a couple of them in process and completed.

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Todd working hard on a group design task

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The group design task provides students the opportunity to apply the theory they’ve learned in the first half of the course and gets them ready for their second design task where they can refine their learnings and create magic.

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And a couple of close ups of the finished result, we are so impressed with the quality of our students work in applying the permaculture ethics and principles onto real landscapes in their first design project. So impressed. We’re really looking forward to their second solo design task, where we know great things will happen.

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Our current course is a part-time one so students have been finding ways to work together on their group designs (which they’ve just presented) in between our weekends together. One group created a blog where they stored their information and added to it as their design progressed. The final version of their design and associated support documents aren’t all uploaded yet – however it’s a great indication into what a design consists of, you can have a look here.

When we’re not inside focusing on design theory, you’ll find us outside learning practical skills that support good design and implementation…. Like aerobics – everyone knows you need aerobics in your life as a permaculture designer, duh.

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 Aerobics… To  keep the body and brain warm in Tassie’s chilly winter

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Other practical activities we’ve been exploring include propagation of which there are many, many types. These are basic and powerful techniques which will save you big bucks and see you collecting cuttings and seeds everywhere you go.

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We’ve taught both low-tech (A-frame and the bunyip level above) and high-tech (laser level)  methods in finding and marking out contour lines. Here you can see Caroline and Nysha learning the ways of the bunyip level, aka the water level. Where ever possible we make sure we teach a range of options for what tools and methods you can use so that even if you’re working with a tiny budget you can get the job done.

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Soil testing! Knowing simple techniques to test and analyse your soil means that you can get to know a new site quick smart and determine how you might approach the land. Above you can see support teacher, Nick Towle, teaching students the jar test, while below the trusty pH soil test provides an indication of where your soil’s at. In addition to these two, the ribbon test is another technique we play around with.

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When we can’t physically take you to the types of landscapes we’d like to show you, we make them instead. Below David Holmgren (yep, that’s right David Holmgren) talks students through keyline water management theory and systems.

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We also take students out and about to show them real life permaculture sites in development and other great people who are seriously rocking it in terms of creating productive landscapes and viable, meaningful livelihoods. This is so important as it shows theory in action and also provides a reality check into the amount of work, time and commitment involved to establish and maintain productive, healthy systems.

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Good Life’s homestead. While checking out our chook house, we realised our chickens are back on the lay after a long winter hiatus – huzzah! That paddock in the background is actually our neighbour’s property.

IMG_0243 Paulette Whitney and her family’s farm – Provenance Growers. Paulette took us on an edible weeds tour throughout her market garden, where she also cultivates more traditional greens, herbs and vegetables.

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IMG_0241Getting acquainted with new tastes, some of our students have a nibble on a range of edible, nutritious ‘weeds’
IMG_0199And then there’s Suzi’s market garden in urban South Hobart. Suzi is a force of nature and a bloody good gardener with a particular focus on soil health… as all good gardeners tend to have.  Suzi practices what she calls forest floor gardening – we like it so much we did a little write up about it which you can read here.

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  Suzi also has 5 incredibly friendly goats (one which is pregnant with twins – oh the cuteness) and chickens which we couldn’t pull the students away from. Those sheep in the background are on the neighbour’s land.

Other unplanned things that happen on a Permaculture Design Course are usually the divine, golden moments that warm your heart and make memories you’ll never forget. Like the one below, where our students presented us with a compost cake while visiting our home to celebrate Good Life’s first birthday.  As far as we’re concerned, this is the most beautiful, incredibly awesome present we could have every hoped for!

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The compost cake in all its glory. It’s moment’s like these that I remember I have one darn fine life.

We run Permaculture Design Courses regularly throughout the year, both part-time (as the one above it) and 2 week intensives. You can see what’s coming up here, sign up to our newsletter and like us on facebook to make sure you hear about them first.

*Your blogger is Hannah Moloney, co-director of Good Life Permaculture and lover of all things fun and garden-esk.

**Thanks to Tamas Oszvald (again) for a lot of these photos

 

 

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