Posts tagged ‘good life permaculture’

Permaculture Design Course

19 January – 2 February, 2018, Dodges Ferry, Southern Tasmania

Join us for two weeks of deep permaculture design learning. You’ll leave this course knowing how to design resilient, robust landscapes & people-scapes in a  beautiful learning environment.

This Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) has been structured so you get to design your own property of choice, plus complete a permaculture design for a real life client and property. This provides you the opportunity to test and practice permaculture designing in a range of contexts with the support of experienced designers and practitioners right at your side to step you through it all.

As a fully catered, residential course you’ll get to immerse yourself in all things permaculture with like-minded folk. Classes run from 8:30am – 5pm each day with some optional (but highly recommended) evening sessions over the two weeks.

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I loved this course. It hasn’t just changed my outlook on life – it’s changed my life (Anita).

This course covers a wide breadth of topics including…
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  • Permaculture ethics & principles
  • Design theory and practical application
  • Systems thinking
  • Patterns understanding
  • Water management, in the home and in the land
  • Soil health: How to improve and maintain it
  • Cropping systems: food production, seed saving and integrated pest management
  • Alternative economics
  • Energy systems
  • Social permaculture
  • Food forests
  • Sustainable building design
  • Plus more. View the full course schedule here. 

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Just wonderfully fun. So well coordinated (always on time, always organised), experience of a lifetime, truly life changing. Thank you so much (Nysha).

Who should do this course?

This PDC is for farmers, perennial renters, community development workers, sustainability officers, university students, students of life, market gardeners and big thinkers. Permaculture is relevant and useful to you whether you’re working in the paddock or in the office, you’ll become equipped with thinking tools to design properties *and* the life you’ve always wanted!

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What the PDC is not…

First and foremost, the PDC is a design course. It is not a hands on course where you actively get to grow food, build a house or ferment food… Although we do like to make yoghurt and kimchi with you (plus some other fun things), as it’s simple and powerful stuff. This means that while we will touch on the above topics, we will not focus on teaching you the practical skills for each one. Rather, we’re committed to teaching you foundation knowledge for each topic so you can create designs which are integrated, appropriate and darn clever. You can read about some of our previous PDCs here & here. If you’d like to learn how to learn some hands-on, practical skills – have a look at some of the exciting short workshops we’ve got coming up.

As part of your course fee you receive…

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  • Free camping (BYO all your own camping gear)
  • Delicious and nutritious vegetarian catering for the full course
  • Course resources
  • Field trips to local properties featuring clever design in action
  • A one year membership to Pip Permaculture Magazine
  • A whole bunch of new permaculture friends and networks

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The Teaching Team

Stay tuned for our full teaching team to be announced in the coming months. 

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YOUR LEAD TEACHER: Hannah Moloney is a professional permaculture designer who has been working with urban/rural property owners since 2012 to create productive, beautiful landscapes. With a strong background in community cultural development she’s been working on community projects that create positive change since 2001 and teaching permaculture since 2009 across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute (since closed), Milkwood Permaculture and at home in Tasmania with Good Life Permaculture.

In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of working alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke (US author of Edible Forest Gardens). In 2015 she was awarded the Tasmanian ‘Young Landcare Leader Award’ for her work with Good Life Permaculture and co-founding Hobart City Farm. You can read more about Hannah here.

Nick Towle is a passionate advocate for sustainability and permaculture and brings a diverse set of skills to the course including home-based sustainability practices and community economic systems. His most recent permaculture adventure has involved establishing the RESEED Trust, a two acre urban property in the heart of Penguin (NW Tasmania) which is being developed into a permaculture demonstration site and sustainability education centre.

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Anton Vikstrom is a sustainability specialist with deep experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development and energy efficiency.  He’s had the pleasure to work with The Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and currently works with Sustainable Living Tasmania (in energy efficiency projects) and Good Life Permaculture (as designer and teacher).  His intellect is backed up with practical sustainability skills – from off-grid solar power, small-scale beekeeping, carpentry, landscaping to brewing beer, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

We also take our students on field trips to see and meet other fantastic sites and people. 

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Thanks for being awesome! Thanks also for the shared life-experiences/knowledge of the teachers. One thing that really stood-out for me was the “people care” of the students, and everyone really, throughout the two weeks. I have never before experienced this in the many workshops, courses and places of learning/study that I have attended. My wish is that such a thing becomes the “normal” way of being – YEAH!

Venue

We’re holding this course at the vibrant Okines Community House and garden in Dodges Ferry, southern Tasmania. This active community hub features a food co-op, beautiful community garden, a pizza oven and is located near a local surf beach – it’s a rocking place!

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Accommodation

We provide free camping (BYO all your own gear) onsite with access to toilets, showers and inside spaces to relax in.

If you’d prefer to not camp, there are also local places you can stay independently, have a look at a large selection herehere and here. 

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One Full PDC Scholarship on Offer!

In the spirit of fair share, we’re offering one full scholarship to a lucky someone. The person we give this scholarship to will be someone who:

  • Does not have the financial capacity to attend the PDC, and
  • Is committed to applying their new skills to benefit more than just themselves.

Applications close November 30th. To apply CLICK HERE. 

Catering

We provide nutritious and delicious vegetarian food for the entire course and can cater for a large range of dietary needs with wholesome, locally sourced and organic food where possible.

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How to get to the PDC

Dodges Ferry is approximately 45 minutes from Hobart and 30 minutes from the Hobart airport.

  • By Boat: If you’re coming from Melbourne, Victoria – you can catch the boat (a 12 hour journey) from Port Melbourne to Devonport. From Devonport it is a 4 hour drive to Dodges Ferry.  To see the timetable and book your ticket visit the Spirit of Tasmania
  • By car: If you’re driving to the course and have a spare seat you’re willing to offer to another student, please get in touch so we can help connect you. It’s also well worth checking out Cool Pool Tas, Tasmania’s very own car pooling network! There is easy bike and car parking at the venue in an off street car park.
  • By bus: There are regular buses traveling from Hobart to Dodges Ferry, check out the timetable here.
  • By plane: The closest airports to Dodges Ferry is the Hobart airport. Check out the webjet website to find the most affordable deal. To get to Dodges Ferry from the airport your options are to hire a car, or talk to us about organising a carpooling arrangement with a fellow student or a possible bulk pick up.

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Why study with Good Life Permaculture?

  • We are Tasmania’s expert permaculture education provider, committed to facilitating meaningful and high quality learning processes for our students. We have REALLY applied our heads, hearts and hands to create this course to be one of the best permaculture adult education experiences available.
  • Our teachers are amongst the most experienced and passionate in Australia. You will always have at least one professional permaculture designer/practitioner on site at all times.
  • We are committed to ensuring our students are equipped with the best start possible to being competent and effective designers and practitioners.
  • We feed your mind with a huge array of top quality content. We also feed your body with delicious and nutritious food for the whole course. Where possible we source local and organic foods to support Tasmanian growers and producers.
  • Upon completion of the course, you’ll be on your way to being a professional permaculture designer (if this interests you), be able to teach on a permaculture design course and continue studying towards your permaculture diploma, anywhere in the world. Cool hey!

Payment Plan

If you’d like to establish a payment plan so you can pay the course fee over a period of months we’re very happy to work with you to create that. We ask that people set up this plan prior to the course, so that the fee is paid in full by the time the course commences. Please send us an email at hello@goodlifepermaculture.com.au and we can sort out the details.

Cancellation Policy

We ask that you give us two weeks notice if you choose to step out of the course; we’ll provide a refund, minus the deposit fee. Alternatively you can pass your place onto a friend or family member or choose to use this as credit towards one of our future courses. If we have to cancel the course for whatever reason, we’ll provide a full refund immediately.

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Fermentation Fest

Want to learn how to make simple, nutritious and delicious ferments in your own home?

We’ve designed this practical, hands-on learning experience just for you, showing you how to make:

  • Tempeh (soybeans inoculated and fermented with rhizopus spores),
  • Sauerkraut and kim chi (both wild ferments based on salt and cabbage),
  • Pickles (with vegetables),
  • Country wine (using seasonal fruits),
  • Sourdough bread, and
  • Yoghurt.

Skills that will be useful for the rest of your days! We’ll also feed you a delicious and nutritious lunch featuring all things fermented from locally sourced, chemical-free and homegrown produce.

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Students receive

  • A jar of sauerkraut which you’ll make on the day,
  • A tempeh kit (tempeh spores, soybeans and instructions) so you can make your own at home,
  • A sourdough starter,
  • A scrumptious lunch where we’ll feed you with as many fermented things we can make, and
  • Extensive notes on how to start or keep fermenting food for the rest of your life.

Teaching Team

IMG_6691Over the past 12 years, Anton Vikstrom has dappled, explored and has now completely integrated ferments into his daily life.  There is always something bubbling on his kitchen bench or in the pantry and always unique and scrumptious smells wafting through the air.  He especially enjoys teaching the fermentation process as it should be, simply.  He breaks the processes down into easy steps so that anyone, yes anyone, can get fermenting – anywhere, any time. That’s him in the photo with a bunch of homegrown hops used to make homebrew! You can read more about him here.

 

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margaret-284x300Margaret Steadman is a local sustainability maven and makes a wicked sourdough loaf. Specialising in ‘keeping it simple’, she’ll step you through the basics of how to make amazingly delicious sourdough, share some of her starter with you and feed you with her bread as part of lunch. Her deep and passion for living life simply and well is so contagious that’ll you’re all going to fall in love her, just a bit! ,

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Venue & Times

This course is being held at the very wonderful Sustainable Learning Centre at 50 Olinda Grove, Mt Nelson and runs from 10am – 4pm.

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Sourdough starters being shared around and some rather delicious fresh tempeh!

Fermentation Resources

Look no further than Sandor Katz and his Wild Fermentation website – enjoy!

Cancellation Policy

There are no refunds available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

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Introduction To Small-Scale Beekeeping

A one day introduction course designed for the beginner and novice beekeeper keen to have one (or a few) hives in their homes. We’ll guide you through the key foundations of bee theory and action so that by the end of the day you’ll be either ready to start on your bee journey, add to it or refine it.

Ready to book your place? Just scroll down to the bottom of this page.

This workshop will

  • Provide the theory you need to get started in beekeeping
  • Discuss the importance of bees in our food systems, key threats to their health and how you can help them out
  • Show you three different types of hives – the langstroth, warre and top bar beehive and how they work so you can make an informed decision for your own place
  • Open a live hive so you can see how to manage and work with bees on a practical level
  • Introduce you to some of the simple and best tools to utilise as a beginner beekeeper

Students receive

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  • A bee veil
  • Morning and afternoon tea and treats (We ask people to bring a plate of food to share for lunch)
  •  A whole bunch of new bee friends and networks to stay in contact with.
  • Course notes, jam packed with information to support you to be a gun beekeeper!

Your Teachers


img_6849Anton Vikstrom
is a sustainability specialist (and a self confessed renaissance man) with over 15 years experience in urban agriculture, renewable energy, international development, energy efficiency and sustainability. In recent years, honey bees have crept into his list of passions and he currently keeps top bar hives and is looking to expand in numbers and types. Anton is one of those rare breeds with both deep theoretical knowledge and practical capabilities. Over the years, this has seen him work for the Alternative Technology Association, Cultivating Community and Sustainable Living Tasmania. At the same time he has finally honed his practical skills in everything from off-grid solar power, carpentry, landscaping, brewing beers and wines, fermenting, kite making and sewing.

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img_6834James Da Costa
grew up on the NW coast of Tasmania and currently lives in lovely Hobart town. He has been keeping bees on a backyard scale for the past 4 years and throughout this time has been collecting and re-homing swarms and wild colonies of honey bees. He currently manages around 6 hives in suburban settings, is a founding member of the Hobart City Farm and has a background in permaculture design, community engagement and small-scale food systems. Over the past two years he has been building and sampling the workings of a few different hive designs and is interested in the effects of these designs on bee health, behaviour and how their unique designs and construction methods lend themselves to people’s diverse situations.

Venues

We’re hosting this one day extravaganza in central Tarroona across two nearby locations. We’ll provide complete instructions and maps to students prior to the course.

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Cancellation policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

Feeling keen? You can read more about different types of beehives here.

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Beauty In The Weekend

While the concept of the weekend is very man-made and imperfect in many ways, we’re enjoying having some.

Last weekend we overcame the howling wind and rain and went to our mate’s birthday party in a paddock and little house. Despite the chill, it was heartwarming.  Taking time is always heartwarming and when done with loved ones, it’s even better. People care is never time wasted.

Sam, his very large bonfire and some casual archery happening over to the left. A typical Tassie gathering. 

Our very ace friend, Grace ran a spoon making workshop on the porch of her little paddock shack.

Image by Grace

We cut the young, weedy poplar trees down, split them with an axe and Grace shared her super sharp whittling tools with us which make whittling incredibly dreamy and easy.

Image by Grace

I made a funny little “paddle” spoon (the white one below) to add to our existing collection of hand made spoons and butter knife at home.

Not as snazzy as Grace’s spoon collection, but still has the beauty that can only come with hand made.

Image by Grace

We really enjoy our talented, creative friends. Whether it’s spoon carving, lighting *really* large bonfires or building their own little paddock shack (as Grace has below) – they’re a talented bunch. Hanging out with them reminds me of the important things in life – good connections and good times.

You can follow Grace and her spoon adventures over at Heartspoons. 

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Design Case Studies

We’re gradually adding a range of case studies to our website so you can have a little look at what permaculture design can look like in drastically different contexts.

Fat Pig Farm

You might know Fat Pig Farm through Matthew Evans and his TV show, The Gourmet Farmer. As well as being a bit famous, Matthew and Sadie Chrestman happen to be very fabulous – pouring their hearts into their farm and work. They’ve managed to recruit some of the most talented and loveliest people to work on their farm and restaurant – we love working (and eating) there.

We’ve done a range of design work for this wonderful farm, including this most recent design that focuses on wind break design to protect their pumping market garden.

Exposed to some vicious south and westerly winds, this market garden is getting a multilayered windbreak to help it thrive. 

 

Grow Community Garden

Initiated by the community and supported by Mission Australia, this community garden is particularly unique. Surrounded by a school and the local Child and Family Centre, it oozes “community” and is an exciting place to visit – great things will happen here, in and out of the ground. Check it out. 

A pizza oven with steel pergola over it. Two grape vines are planted at its base and will eventually grow up and over the pergola to create seasonal shade, beauty and food. 

A dry-stone bridge providing all-inclusion access throughout the garden and looking darn pretty in the process. 

Bream Creek Community Market Garden

This motivated bunch of people have borrowed a patch of land from a local farmer and breathed new life into it to create a community market garden. Driven by volunteers, it’s an inspiring model and what getting organised can do for a rural region. We love this project.  

Their farm stand shop selling seasonal produce direct from the garden. 

It is such a joy to work with people to (a) create a property design that suits their needs, and (b) watch them turn it into a reality! You can explore more of our case studies and our design services here. 

  • FYI, we usually have at least a one month waiting period for designs, so book in sooner rather than later if you’re keen.
  • If you’d like to learn how to get started in creating a permaculture design for your own place, check out our summer Permaculture Design Course.
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Free Home Composting Workshop # 2

How To Compost Food Waste: July 9th

We’re working with the City of Hobart this year on The Home Composting Project, supporting people to compost their food waste at home and keeping it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

Part of this program includes running two free compost workshops in central Hobart. Participants attending are invited to take part in a month-long process of composting their food waste and keeping a record of how much they divert from landfill to explore how effective it is. We’ll supply you with a free “data recording kit” and the skills you need to get going.

You’ll learn about composting food waste with: DSF4994-2-1024x682-1024x682

  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.

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Spaces are limited, register today!

Your compost teacher

Scan-1024x849Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold (compost).

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No-till Soil Prep For Crops

No-till soil prep is a way of growing crops from year to year without disturbing the soil through tillage – meaning you improve soil health over time rather than consistently degrading it.  It’s a method quite common in the market gardening community and something we’re starting to use at our own place now that we have nice, long straight’ish beds.

On the new patch of land we recently bought we did some significant earthworks in Autumn and have been growing green manures ever since. We’re letting 98% of the green manure crops grow until late winter, but we did put in a small garlic patch and used the no-till method to help us do it.

This method uses silage tarps as a form of weed/crop control, meaning instead of digging in your green manures (or crops) you temporarily cover the bed in non-toxic, UV stabilised plastic to do the job for you. I know – it sounds whack and it actually took me a while to get my head around it. But after seeing it in action at the Hobart City Farm, and seeing how darn well it worked I was sold.

Here’s how we did it for our little garlic patch…

Firstly we cut the green manure crops down to the ground, as they were already pretty short we left all the green waste on the bed. If your crops are really tall you’ll want to remove some of them as too much fresh, green matter can create an anaerobic environment which isn’t great for soil life and health.

Then we planted directly into the bed with no digging except to make a small hole for each garlic. We also sprinkled a small amount of gypsum as our soil needs this. This is where you might want to spread a layer of compost, it just depends on your soils and crops.

Planting, planting, planting


Once fully planted, water in the crop (if needed) and cover with your silage tarp. We actually used non-toxic black builders plastic as this is what we had available. While we’re a bit unclear whether this is acceptable for organically certified farms we do know some market gardeners who use it in this way who grow chemically-free and grow well! We’re comfortable using it as our research tells us this particular type is non-toxic and UV stabilised.

What’s the plastic actually doing?

  • It’s killing any fresh growth currently there (the green manures), keeping their roots in tact for the soil life to thrive in and around,
  • Suppressing/killing weed seeds,
  • Heating the soil up – increasing the rate of germination, and
  • Drawing up soil life (earthworms galore) to the top layers of the soil where it’s still dark and moist thanks to the plastic.

How long does the plastic stay on there?

This varies depending on the season, weather and crop rotation system you have in place. We left ours on the garlic for around one month, checking it every now and then to see if it had germinated.

Once you can see fairly even germination it’s time for the plastic to come off.

The garlic you can see above and below is pale green/white, this is fine as it’ll green up in 2-3 weeks. The main thing we like is the lack of competing plants that garlic has to deal with (garlic hates competitors) and the fact we didn’t have to do the usual manual weeding to get it to this point.

As we’re having a unusually dry winter we’re now watering the garlic a bit to kick it along – otherwise our work here is done. We’ll water as needed (c’mon winter rains!) and do some light manual weeding here and there – but the next key job we’ll have to do here is harvesting later on in the year. Yesss!

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Free Home Composting Workshop # 1

How To Compost Food Waste: June 11th

We’re working with the City of Hobart this year on The Home Composting Project, supporting people to compost their food waste at home and keeping it out of landfill where it becomes a pollutant.

Part of this program includes running two free compost workshops in central Hobart. Participants attending are invited to take part in a month-long process of composting their food waste and keeping a record of how much they divert from landfill to explore how effective it is. We’ll supply you with a free “data recording kit” and the skills you need to get going.

You’ll learn about composting food waste with: DSF4994-2-1024x682-1024x682

  • Chickens,
  • Small compost bins,
  • Large compost bays and piles, and
  • Compost worm farms.

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Spaces are limited, register today!

Your compost teacher

Scan-1024x849Hannah Moloney is director of Good Life Permaculture, co-founder of The Hobart City Farm and brings *many* years of experience to composting. She’s worked with Cultivating Community and the City of Yarra running innovative community composting programs plus a number of home composting pilot projects with the City of Hobart. Passionate about composting food waste, Hannah educates people how to harness this precious resource and transform this kitchen waste into garden gold (compost).

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Our Permaculture Design Course: A Student’s Insight!

Every permaculture design course (PDC) we run we always offer at least one full scholarship to make sure we support people who need it most to access this training. On our last PDC Permaculture Tasmania also sponsored someone to come along – how fantastic! Meet Shane and read about his experience below.

Shane working hard on his group design project and fellow student, Ryan working in the community garden we hold this course in. 

“I recently completed a PDC with Good Life Permaculture at Okines Community Garden/Centre at Dodges Ferry just out of Hobart. It was a great educational and totally engaging experience which brought together excellent teachers in their fields, and a group hungry to absorb all that was given to them. The course brought together people from a range of countries and diverse backgrounds who left with many new friends and a direction to move in. The venue too was a great choice, showcasing how the local community can be brought together with great initiatives which seek to be inclusive of all.

I had previously completed a PDC with Bill Mollison and Janet Millington back in 2002 and then a family came along and a mortgage and I sort of lost my way a bit. I had always kept in touch with what was going on, and I have used this course as a chance to get back on the horse and gain some new inspiration and direction.

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I believe this course also helped me with my own confidence, being able to say what one thought without being judged on personal values was a great feeling in itself.

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I had always thought I’d had a pretty sound knowledge of permaculture systems, this course however with its fabulous teaching staff helped to flesh it out even more for me and hammered home the point that permaculture “is not just about gardening”. That being said it was awesome to go check out and learn from some great permie ‘gardeners’ on the field trip. The importance of applying the ethics and principles as much as possible without being a ‘permacultist’ was also duly noted, no-one is perfect but it’s worth giving it a good crack. Something really important I had forgotten was to start from zone 0/1 and work outwards, it would have made my life a whole lot easier!

Now I’m back in “real life’ and looking for a change. I’m helping out at a new community garden we’re are about to start in St Helens (NE Tas), the fence is up and we’re getting into a bit of planning using the knowledge I gained from the course.  We will be taking on a work for the dole program there and aiming to provide education, training and health driven outcomes for members of the community, and pass on the permie bug! Hopefully I can encourage more members of my local community to think more deeply about the impacts we all can have and make them positive ones!

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Finally, I fully encourage anyone who is wondering about their place in the world to look into permaculture, be inspired, take a course and pass on the knowledge you gain. If your teachers are half as good as these guys you’ll still find it a positive life changing experience.

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Thank you very much Permaculture Tasmania, and extra big thanks to Hannah Moloney, Anton Vikstrom, Nick Ritar, Jonathon Cooper, Oberon Carter and Millie Rooney. Not forgetting the kitchen crew Lou, Maddie and Kathy and of course Mr Resourceful, that’s you Blake!”

Thank you Shane! Thanks for coming, for investing your time and energy into working out the nuts and bolts for how you can make your own positive impact in your own and your community’s world. Onwards and upwards!

Interested in doing your own permaculture design course?

Join us this Jan 19 – Feb 2 in southern Tasmania for a life changing and affirming learning experience!

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Introduction to Permaculture

Join us for one day of exploration into permaculture. You’ll gain a solid understanding in permaculture foundations and the framework to design your own home in the city or out bush.

Ready to book in? Scroll down to the bottom of the page and go for it!

Immerse yourself in a proactive day of thinking, learning and exploring avenues to respond to some of the biggest social, environmental and economic challenges of our time in a proactive and positive way. Learn the basics in how you can apply permaculture to everything from house design, food production, energy systems and community development, all with a distinct Tasmanian flavour and focus.

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Your permaculture course has completely changed my focus and approach towards my surroundings. I now have a clear vision and outlook of what I want to achieve In my garden and beyond. I have since been describing your course as a springboard. I left feeling inspired to continue learning more about permaculture and to take the first steps to creating a garden for my family to enjoy.

This course covers… grow-comm-garden-design-ap-2016-ilovepdf-compressed-724x1024

  • Origins of permaculture and the global context
  • Permaculture ethics and principles
  • Design framework
  • Fermentation demonstration
  • Composting demonstration
  • Food production: including food forests and annual gardening
  • Water systems
  • House design for cool climates
  • Social permaculture

Students Receive

  • A copy of the Introduction to Permaculture book by Bill Mollison,
  • Morning and afternoon tea/refreshments
  • Course notes, and
  • New friends and networks.

 

Our teaching approach

We draw on a range of theoretical, interactive and hands-on methods in our teaching style with the intention to make sure our students are engaged and that we’re delivering information as thoroughly as possible. This course is approximately 40% theoretical and 60% interactive (group work and facilitated exercises). This is not a gardening course, if you’re after a hands-on workshop have a look at what we have coming up here. 

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Your teacher

img_5913-2-293x300Hannah Moloney grew up on a city farm in Brisbane growing herbs and has over 15 years of hands-on experience in designing, building and managing projects around urban agriculture, small-scale farming, permaculture and community development. She has a post-grad diploma in community cultural development, a diploma in permaculture and since 2009, has been teaching permaculture across Australia with the likes of the Southern Cross Permaculture Institute, the Permaforest Trust (which has since closed) and Milkwood Permaculture. She’s taken short courses in teacher training with Rosemary Morrow, the soil food web with Dr Elaine Ingham and reading the landscape with David Holmgren. In recent years Hannah has had the pleasure of teaching alongside some of the most celebrated permaculturalists in the world including David Holmgren (co-founder of permaculture), Rosemary Morrow and Dave Jacke.

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 I found it very inspiring, lovely to spend a weekend with like minded people while learning more about how to live sustainably while still enjoying a comfortable lifestyle.

Venue

We’re holding this course at the Sustainable Learning Centre in Mt Nelson, Hobart. We’ll provide all details on how to get there for our students just before the course.

Cancellation Policy

There is no refund available for this course. If you’re unable to make it we encourage you to pass your place onto friends or family.

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